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  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019008
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on recent mothers who received maternity or parental benefits in Canada. Data from the 2017 Employment Insurance Coverage Survey are used to describe these mothers in terms of their distribution by age group, income, and the receipt of additional payments provided by an employer while on maternity or parental leave, among other characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-02-28

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510613145
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changes in hours worked normally track employment changes very closely. Recently, however, employment has increased more than hours, resulting in an unprecedented gap. In effect, the average annual hours worked have decreased by the equivalent of two weeks. Many factors can affect the hours worked. Some are structural or cyclical - population aging, industrial shifts, the business cycle, natural disasters, legislative changes or personal preferences. Others are a result of the survey methodology. How have the various factors contributed to the recent drop in hours of work?

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019008
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on recent mothers who received maternity or parental benefits in Canada. Data from the 2017 Employment Insurance Coverage Survey are used to describe these mothers in terms of their distribution by age group, income, and the receipt of additional payments provided by an employer while on maternity or parental leave, among other characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510613145
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changes in hours worked normally track employment changes very closely. Recently, however, employment has increased more than hours, resulting in an unprecedented gap. In effect, the average annual hours worked have decreased by the equivalent of two weeks. Many factors can affect the hours worked. Some are structural or cyclical - population aging, industrial shifts, the business cycle, natural disasters, legislative changes or personal preferences. Others are a result of the survey methodology. How have the various factors contributed to the recent drop in hours of work?

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510213136
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, women have made significant inroads into many traditionally male-dominated occupations. One of these is university teaching. The article looks at the growth in the number of women teaching full time at Canadian universities between 1990-91 and 2002-03, examining changes in their representation by academic rank, tenure, and field of instruction.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27
Date modified: