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All (63) (0 to 10 of 63 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2015096
    Description:

    Using data from the Monthly Retail Trade and Quarterly Retail Commodity surveys, this study examines the sales for the year 2014. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by subsectors such as motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores and general merchandise stores. This study also discusses provincial retail sales.

    Release date: 2015-08-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2014094
    Description:

    Using data from the Monthly Retail Trade and Quarterly Retail Commodity surveys, this study examines the sales for the year 2013. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by subsectors such as motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores and general merchandise stores. This study also discusses provincial retail sales.

    Release date: 2014-12-17

  • Table: 63-239-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the consumer goods rental industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study focuses on sales pattern for commodities sold by retailers in Canada. Canadians spent more of their retail dollar on frequently purchased goods such as food and beverages and automotive fuels, oils and additives in 2008 and less on big ticket items such as new vehicles. The only commodity group to decline in 2008 was motor vehicles, parts and services which made up one-fifth of total spending. The market share analysis shows that general merchandisers sold more food and beverages, sporting and leisure goods and housewares as a share of their total sales.

    Release date: 2009-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009078
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Retail Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2008. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by trade groups such as new motor vehicle dealers, supermarkets and general merchandise stores. This study focuses on provincial sales.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm turnover and productivity growth in the Canadian retail trade sector. Firm turnover occurs as the competitive process shifts market share from exiting firms and existing firms that contracted to entering firms and existing firms that expanded. There is considerably more firm turnover in the retail sector than in the manufacturing sector and more of it comes from entry and exit. Moreover, contrary to the manufacturing sector where only part of overall productivity growth comes from firm turnover and the re-allocation of resources from the less to the more productive, all of the aggregate productivity growth comes from this source in the retail sector. This suggests that the much-discussed Wal-Mart effect on retail sector productivity mainly comes from the Wal-Mart-created competitive pressure that shifts market share from exitors and declining incumbents to entrants and growing incumbents. Foreign-controlled firms contributed 30% of labour productivity growth and 45% of multifactor productivity growth in the retail trade sector in the period from 1984 to 1996, which are mainly due to the entry of foreign-controlled firms and expansion of more productive foreign-controlled existing firms.

    Release date: 2008-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007 by commodity grouping. This annual review describes sales growth and trends between 1998 and 2007 and between 2006 and 2007. This study also looks at changes of market share between sectors.

    Release date: 2008-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008071
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Retail Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by trade groups such as new motor vehicle dealers, supermarkets and general merchandise stores. This study focuses on provincial sales.

    Release date: 2008-05-26
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 63-239-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the consumer goods rental industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-16

  • Table: 56-001-X20040047805
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the cable, direct-to-home satellite and wireless cable television industries for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Table: 56-001-X20020037898
    Description:

    The cable industry is going through a fundamental transformation. Only a few years ago, this regulated industry could be described as consisting of territorial monopolies engaged in the delivery of analogue programming services. Since 1997 the regulatory environment has evolved, new techonologies and services have emerged, and service providers have been positioning themselves in existing and new markets.

    Release date: 2002-11-19

  • Table: 22-201-X
    Description:

    This publication, prepared in conjunction with the Canadian Grain Commission, provides a comprehensive look at the past crop year. Included are key data series on production, stocks, cash and future prices, crop quality, domestic processing, grain handlings and detailed supply-disposition analyses. A written overview summarizes the year's market conditions, domestically and internationally.

    Release date: 2002-06-10

  • Table: 50-002-X20000025103
    Description:

    The ports handled a total of 274.3 million tonnes (Mt.) of cargo. Strong increases in domestic shipments, particularly in the forest sector were sufficient to offset a decline in international shipments, which were strongly affected by a decrease in iron ore shipments to US ports.

    Release date: 2000-07-12
Analysis (58)

Analysis (58) (0 to 10 of 58 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2015096
    Description:

    Using data from the Monthly Retail Trade and Quarterly Retail Commodity surveys, this study examines the sales for the year 2014. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by subsectors such as motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores and general merchandise stores. This study also discusses provincial retail sales.

    Release date: 2015-08-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2014094
    Description:

    Using data from the Monthly Retail Trade and Quarterly Retail Commodity surveys, this study examines the sales for the year 2013. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by subsectors such as motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores and general merchandise stores. This study also discusses provincial retail sales.

    Release date: 2014-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study focuses on sales pattern for commodities sold by retailers in Canada. Canadians spent more of their retail dollar on frequently purchased goods such as food and beverages and automotive fuels, oils and additives in 2008 and less on big ticket items such as new vehicles. The only commodity group to decline in 2008 was motor vehicles, parts and services which made up one-fifth of total spending. The market share analysis shows that general merchandisers sold more food and beverages, sporting and leisure goods and housewares as a share of their total sales.

    Release date: 2009-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009078
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Retail Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2008. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by trade groups such as new motor vehicle dealers, supermarkets and general merchandise stores. This study focuses on provincial sales.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm turnover and productivity growth in the Canadian retail trade sector. Firm turnover occurs as the competitive process shifts market share from exiting firms and existing firms that contracted to entering firms and existing firms that expanded. There is considerably more firm turnover in the retail sector than in the manufacturing sector and more of it comes from entry and exit. Moreover, contrary to the manufacturing sector where only part of overall productivity growth comes from firm turnover and the re-allocation of resources from the less to the more productive, all of the aggregate productivity growth comes from this source in the retail sector. This suggests that the much-discussed Wal-Mart effect on retail sector productivity mainly comes from the Wal-Mart-created competitive pressure that shifts market share from exitors and declining incumbents to entrants and growing incumbents. Foreign-controlled firms contributed 30% of labour productivity growth and 45% of multifactor productivity growth in the retail trade sector in the period from 1984 to 1996, which are mainly due to the entry of foreign-controlled firms and expansion of more productive foreign-controlled existing firms.

    Release date: 2008-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007 by commodity grouping. This annual review describes sales growth and trends between 1998 and 2007 and between 2006 and 2007. This study also looks at changes of market share between sectors.

    Release date: 2008-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008071
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Retail Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes sales growth and trends by trade groups such as new motor vehicle dealers, supermarkets and general merchandise stores. This study focuses on provincial sales.

    Release date: 2008-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries. Second, it examines the relationship between offshoring and changes in trade patterns at the industry level. It focuses on two major drivers that some have suggested are behind the recent trends toward offshoring: globalization and technological changes associated with information and communications technologies. Third, the paper examines the economic impact of offshoring by investigating the relationship between the extent of offshoring and productivity growth, shifts to high value-added activities and changes in labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-05-23
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