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All (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2022001
    Description:

    This paper analyzes water use by three important manufacturing industries. These industries include the pulp and paper industry, the primary metal industry, and the petroleum and coal product industry.

    Release date: 2022-06-10

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. Created against the background of the North American Free Trade Agreement, it is designed to provide common definitions of the industrial structure of the three countries and a common statistical framework to facilitate the analysis of the three economies. NAICS is based on supply-side or production-oriented principles, to ensure that industrial data, classified to NAICS, are suitable for the analysis of production-related issues such as industrial performance.

    NAICS is a comprehensive system encompassing all economic activities. It has a hierarchical structure. At the highest level, it divides the economy into 20 sectors. At lower levels, it further distinguishes the different economic activities in which businesses are engaged.

    Emailstatcan.csds-standards-industry-cnsd-normes-industrie.statcan@statcan.gc.ca  

    Release date: 2022-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • 64C0013
    Description:

    Quarterly and annual estimates of capacity utilization for good producing industries (excluding farmers), historically back to 1971.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001004
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. This working paper presents descriptive statistics on business environment, success factors, use and planned use of advanced technologies, use and planned use of advanced practices, source of information, obstacles and impact.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001003
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. It was based on a list of businesses classified to construction industries taken from the Statistics Canada's Business Register. The survey consists of eight sections with questions on business environment; success factors; use and planned use of advanced technologies; use and planned use of advanced practices; mergers, acquisitions and expansions; sources of information; obstacles; and impact.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

  • Table: 35-251-X
    Description:

    Data on furniture and fixture industries clearly show the tremendous expansion period affecting these industries. Several establishments have taken advantage of the favourable economic conditions and the openness of North American markets to increase their deliveries to the United States. Foreign markets have been the driving force behind the furniture and fixture industries' growth in the past decade, since large establishments generally have more resources to break into these markets.

    Release date: 2000-09-01
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Table: 35-251-X
    Description:

    Data on furniture and fixture industries clearly show the tremendous expansion period affecting these industries. Several establishments have taken advantage of the favourable economic conditions and the openness of North American markets to increase their deliveries to the United States. Foreign markets have been the driving force behind the furniture and fixture industries' growth in the past decade, since large establishments generally have more resources to break into these markets.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Table: 31-212-X
    Description:

    This publication shows expenditures, by industry, for the various types of packaging materials.

    Release date: 2000-03-03

  • Table: 71-539-X
    Description:

    This publication about worker turnover in the Canadian economy provides comprehensive data for the first time on job separations and hiring, with emphasis on permanent separations, temporary separations, quits and layoffs.

    Release date: 1998-06-25
Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2022001
    Description:

    This paper analyzes water use by three important manufacturing industries. These industries include the pulp and paper industry, the primary metal industry, and the petroleum and coal product industry.

    Release date: 2022-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001004
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. This working paper presents descriptive statistics on business environment, success factors, use and planned use of advanced technologies, use and planned use of advanced practices, source of information, obstacles and impact.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001003
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. It was based on a list of businesses classified to construction industries taken from the Statistics Canada's Business Register. The survey consists of eight sections with questions on business environment; success factors; use and planned use of advanced technologies; use and planned use of advanced practices; mergers, acquisitions and expansions; sources of information; obstacles; and impact.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fabricated metal products industries remain in the middle of an expansion period. The construction sector's vitality, as well as the high North-American demand for industrial products, allow metal products manufacturers to live glorious days. However, where competitiveness is concerned, there could be trouble in paradise. In the last few years, the cost of labour has been on the rise, while the value added for each paid hour has been weakening. Moreover, imports have been increasing at a higher pace than exports in the last two years.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-250-X
    Description:

    Data from the Annual Survey of manufactures (ASM) is the prime source for this publication. The results of the 1997 survey are supplemented by data from sub-annual Statistics Canada surveys and major economic indicators.

    Release date: 2000-04-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Performance of the textile products industries. by Yasmin Sheikh. The business climate under which the manufacturing sector has been operating has evolved particularly in the last decade. Within manufacturing, certain industries have responded better than others to the challenge brought about by advancement in technology and increased globalization. Textile products was the fastest growing industry in terms of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 1961 to 1987 compared to the overall economy, the manufacturing sector and closely related Primary Textile Industries. However, this industry's GDP declined sharply between 1988 and 1992. Except for 1996, the industry again experienced growth from 1993 onwards but its GDP growth index is well below its peak in 1987.

    Results of the Annual Survey of Manufacturers show that manufacturing shipments of textile products in constant 1992 dollars peaked in 1988 and have since declined. This paper reviews data from this survey for the period 1988 to 1997 to underline the changes in the size, structure and performance of this industry and how it has fared in comparison to the Primary Textiles Industry. It also highlights current developments using results of the Monthly Survey of Manufacturers.

    Release date: 2000-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 45-250-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Refined petroleum and coal products industries" by Randall Sheldrick. The Canadian economy has been on the rise for almost a decade. But, the economy suffered a modest set back in 1998 due to the effects of the Asian economic and financial market crisis. While most manufacturing industries continued to expand, resource-based industries such as refined petroleum were hard hit by a slump in commodity prices.

    This document presents an overview of the Refined Petroleum Products Industry. Most of the findings are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). According to this survey the total value of shipments for the industry stalled at just over $21 billion in 1997. Despite the fact that the industry tends to be cyclical in nature, demand for refined petroleum products is expected to increase steadily into the next century.

    Release date: 2000-04-06
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. Created against the background of the North American Free Trade Agreement, it is designed to provide common definitions of the industrial structure of the three countries and a common statistical framework to facilitate the analysis of the three economies. NAICS is based on supply-side or production-oriented principles, to ensure that industrial data, classified to NAICS, are suitable for the analysis of production-related issues such as industrial performance.

    NAICS is a comprehensive system encompassing all economic activities. It has a hierarchical structure. At the highest level, it divides the economy into 20 sectors. At lower levels, it further distinguishes the different economic activities in which businesses are engaged.

    Emailstatcan.csds-standards-industry-cnsd-normes-industrie.statcan@statcan.gc.ca  

    Release date: 2022-01-27

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
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