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All (5) ((5 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) ((5 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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