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  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201900100002
    Description:

    This is a Health Fact Sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154977
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home to provide a recent assessment of the life satisfaction of seniors in Canada. It includes information on overall life satisfaction, as well as information on nine domains of life satisfaction: standard of living; health; current achievement in life; personal relationships; feeling part of the community; time available to do desired things; and quality of local environment. The paper also explores the factors associated with life satisfaction, and examines several measures of resilience among Canadian seniors.

    Release date: 2018-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05
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  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201900100002
    Description:

    This is a Health Fact Sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154977
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home to provide a recent assessment of the life satisfaction of seniors in Canada. It includes information on overall life satisfaction, as well as information on nine domains of life satisfaction: standard of living; health; current achievement in life; personal relationships; feeling part of the community; time available to do desired things; and quality of local environment. The paper also explores the factors associated with life satisfaction, and examines several measures of resilience among Canadian seniors.

    Release date: 2018-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05
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