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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018010
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home is to explore the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians at work and at home. The section on creative activities and hobbies, in the infographic, highlights the proportion of Canadians who actively participate in these activities, the most popular creative pursuits and the characteristics of people who take part in these activities.

    Release date: 2018-06-05

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114024
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about physical activity during leisure time among Canadians. The data presented refer only to activities during leisure time and do not take account of energy expended at work, in transportation, or doing housework. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2014-06-12

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201300111843
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about physical activity during leisure time among Canadians. The data presented refer only to activities during leisure time and do not take account of energy expended at work, in transportation, or doing housework. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2013-06-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110690
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is about Canadians' participation in active leisure. Active leisure helps keep us fit and healthy. It may also save health care costs. Using data from the 1992 and 2005 General Social Surveys on time use, this article looks at the factors influencing active leisure activities of Canadians aged 20 and over. It will also examine which groups are more likely to participate in active leisure in 2005.

    Release date: 2009-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Public use microdata: 12M0007X
    Description:

    Cycle 7 collected data from persons 15 years of age and older. The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 2 and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities and participation in sports.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1996-08-30
Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018010
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home is to explore the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians at work and at home. The section on creative activities and hobbies, in the infographic, highlights the proportion of Canadians who actively participate in these activities, the most popular creative pursuits and the characteristics of people who take part in these activities.

    Release date: 2018-06-05

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114024
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about physical activity during leisure time among Canadians. The data presented refer only to activities during leisure time and do not take account of energy expended at work, in transportation, or doing housework. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2014-06-12

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201300111843
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about physical activity during leisure time among Canadians. The data presented refer only to activities during leisure time and do not take account of energy expended at work, in transportation, or doing housework. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2013-06-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110690
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is about Canadians' participation in active leisure. Active leisure helps keep us fit and healthy. It may also save health care costs. Using data from the 1992 and 2005 General Social Surveys on time use, this article looks at the factors influencing active leisure activities of Canadians aged 20 and over. It will also examine which groups are more likely to participate in active leisure in 2005.

    Release date: 2009-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0123X
    Description:

    This web page contains examples of societal indicators identified in Managing for results, 1999 tabled in Parliament by the President of the Treasury Board of Canada. Information on societal trends is provided on three clusters of societal indicators: health, environment and physical security; economic opportunity and participation; and social participation and inclusion.

    Release date: 2001-01-23
Date modified: