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All (3)

All (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059111
    Description:

    This article presents an analysis of Census at School survey results that shows what students themselves had to say about their reading and associated daily habits. It was written by Statistics Canada analysts as an example to students of the type of detailed analysis that can be made using Canadian Census at School results. The article uses data that were collected from over 22,000 students across Canada during the 2004-2005 academic year. Census at School is an international classroom project that teaches students aged 8 to 18 about statistical enquiry and census-taking. Students anonymously fill in an online questionnaire about themselves - their height, time use, eating habits and much more - and then use their class results to learn statistical concepts, practice data analysis and explore social issues. Their responses also become part of national and international project databases that are used for teaching statistics.

    The Census at School statistical literacy project is not an official Statistics Canada survey conducted under the Statistics Act. Schools; students participate on a voluntary basis and the data collected are not representative of Canada's student population. This is clearly stated with the summary Canadian results that are made available on the project website for the benefit of participating students.

    Release date: 2006-02-28
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) ((2 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059111
    Description:

    This article presents an analysis of Census at School survey results that shows what students themselves had to say about their reading and associated daily habits. It was written by Statistics Canada analysts as an example to students of the type of detailed analysis that can be made using Canadian Census at School results. The article uses data that were collected from over 22,000 students across Canada during the 2004-2005 academic year. Census at School is an international classroom project that teaches students aged 8 to 18 about statistical enquiry and census-taking. Students anonymously fill in an online questionnaire about themselves - their height, time use, eating habits and much more - and then use their class results to learn statistical concepts, practice data analysis and explore social issues. Their responses also become part of national and international project databases that are used for teaching statistics.

    The Census at School statistical literacy project is not an official Statistics Canada survey conducted under the Statistics Act. Schools; students participate on a voluntary basis and the data collected are not representative of Canada's student population. This is clearly stated with the summary Canadian results that are made available on the project website for the benefit of participating students.

    Release date: 2006-02-28
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