Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (31)

All (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019008
    Description:

    Increasing women’s participation in male-dominated trades has been identified as a means of improving the supply of skilled tradespersons in Canada, creating a more diverse workforce, and increasing women’s wages. However, little information exists about women’s decision to enter male-dominated apprenticeship programs and their subsequent labour market outcomes. This study addresses both information gaps by examining the characteristics associated with women selecting male-dominated apprenticeship programs and their labour market outcomes relative to men who selected the same types of programs.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100010
    Description:

    The purpose of this edition is to raise awareness about the gender wage gap. It does so by presenting "Equal Pay Day" on the date when women effectively start working for free in Canada, and by providing a general overview of women's experiences in the labour market.

    Release date: 2018-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015009
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at increased participation of women in the paid workforce since the 1950s.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), this report examines the labour market experiences of people with disabilities. The CSD data offer opportunities for analysis of disability-specific aspects of employment, such as barriers encountered by people with disabilities, workplace accommodations needed and whether those needs are met, perceptions of disability-related discrimination in the work environment, and labour force discouragement among those who are neither working nor looking for work. This report aims to provide information to employers, and to spark further research in the area of disability and employment.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • 10. Immigrant Women Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28
Analysis (30)

Analysis (30) (0 to 10 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019008
    Description:

    Increasing women’s participation in male-dominated trades has been identified as a means of improving the supply of skilled tradespersons in Canada, creating a more diverse workforce, and increasing women’s wages. However, little information exists about women’s decision to enter male-dominated apprenticeship programs and their subsequent labour market outcomes. This study addresses both information gaps by examining the characteristics associated with women selecting male-dominated apprenticeship programs and their labour market outcomes relative to men who selected the same types of programs.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100010
    Description:

    The purpose of this edition is to raise awareness about the gender wage gap. It does so by presenting "Equal Pay Day" on the date when women effectively start working for free in Canada, and by providing a general overview of women's experiences in the labour market.

    Release date: 2018-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015009
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at increased participation of women in the paid workforce since the 1950s.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), this report examines the labour market experiences of people with disabilities. The CSD data offer opportunities for analysis of disability-specific aspects of employment, such as barriers encountered by people with disabilities, workplace accommodations needed and whether those needs are met, perceptions of disability-related discrimination in the work environment, and labour force discouragement among those who are neither working nor looking for work. This report aims to provide information to employers, and to spark further research in the area of disability and employment.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • 10. Immigrant Women Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: