Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

8 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (12)

All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015050
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the evolution of real annual wages and salaries and employment patterns of young postsecondary graduates by field of study from 2005 to 2012. Results are shown for Canadian-born individuals aged 25 to 34 who are college graduates or hold a bachelor's degree. The data are drawn from the linked 2006 Census–2011 National Household Survey–T1 Personal Master File. Fields of study are defined according to the Classification of Instructional Programs.

    Release date: 2015-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014040
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the cumulative earnings over a 20-year period of college and bachelor's degree graduates from different fields of study. This article is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines various dimensions of labour market outcomes of postsecondary graduates.

    Release date: 2014-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on recent labour market trends in Canada and the United States since the last recession. The data for Canada are from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS), while those for the U.S. are from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a survey produced for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Canadian data have been adjusted to the concepts used in the U.S. for the purposes of comparison with the U.S. data. The data for both countries are monthly and seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the differences between youth and adults in terms of unemployment inflow and outflow rates, for a better understanding of the gap between the unemployment rates of youth and adults. Data from the Labour Force Survey from 1977 to 2012 are used for this analysis. The article is part of a series of Economic Insights articles providing information on the evolution of Canada's economy.

    Release date: 2013-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005012
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper describes per capita employment income disparities across provinces and across the urban-rural continuum, from larger to small cities and between cities and rural areas. Its first objective is to compare the degree of income disparities across provinces to income disparities across the urban-rural continuum. Its second objective is to determine the extent to which provincial disparities can be tied to the urban-rural composition of provinces. The paper also seeks to determine whether urban-rural disparities in per capita employment income stem from poorer labour market conditions in smaller cities and rural areas compared to large cities.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The difference in the output gap (GDP per capita) between Canada and the United States is broken down into two components - differences in productivity (GDP per hour worked) and differences in effort (hours worked per capita) for the period 1994 to 2002. The paper shows that, on average, the majority of the output gap is accounted for by differences in hours worked rather than differences in productivity. Since 1994, the output gap has narrowed slightly, primarily because of an increase in hours worked in Canada relative to the United States.

    Release date: 2005-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares Canada and Australia with respect to living standards; labour productivity and utilization; and underlying sources of labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2003-12-09
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015050
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the evolution of real annual wages and salaries and employment patterns of young postsecondary graduates by field of study from 2005 to 2012. Results are shown for Canadian-born individuals aged 25 to 34 who are college graduates or hold a bachelor's degree. The data are drawn from the linked 2006 Census–2011 National Household Survey–T1 Personal Master File. Fields of study are defined according to the Classification of Instructional Programs.

    Release date: 2015-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014040
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the cumulative earnings over a 20-year period of college and bachelor's degree graduates from different fields of study. This article is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines various dimensions of labour market outcomes of postsecondary graduates.

    Release date: 2014-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on recent labour market trends in Canada and the United States since the last recession. The data for Canada are from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS), while those for the U.S. are from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a survey produced for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Canadian data have been adjusted to the concepts used in the U.S. for the purposes of comparison with the U.S. data. The data for both countries are monthly and seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the differences between youth and adults in terms of unemployment inflow and outflow rates, for a better understanding of the gap between the unemployment rates of youth and adults. Data from the Labour Force Survey from 1977 to 2012 are used for this analysis. The article is part of a series of Economic Insights articles providing information on the evolution of Canada's economy.

    Release date: 2013-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005012
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper describes per capita employment income disparities across provinces and across the urban-rural continuum, from larger to small cities and between cities and rural areas. Its first objective is to compare the degree of income disparities across provinces to income disparities across the urban-rural continuum. Its second objective is to determine the extent to which provincial disparities can be tied to the urban-rural composition of provinces. The paper also seeks to determine whether urban-rural disparities in per capita employment income stem from poorer labour market conditions in smaller cities and rural areas compared to large cities.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The difference in the output gap (GDP per capita) between Canada and the United States is broken down into two components - differences in productivity (GDP per hour worked) and differences in effort (hours worked per capita) for the period 1994 to 2002. The paper shows that, on average, the majority of the output gap is accounted for by differences in hours worked rather than differences in productivity. Since 1994, the output gap has narrowed slightly, primarily because of an increase in hours worked in Canada relative to the United States.

    Release date: 2005-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares Canada and Australia with respect to living standards; labour productivity and utilization; and underlying sources of labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2003-12-09
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: