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  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2012098
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report provides a profile of doctoral graduates from Ontario universities in the class of 2005 two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification. The report compares the Ontario results with the aggregate results for doctoral graduates from universities in the rest of Canada as well as results from 2 previous cohorts of graduates; i.e. the classes of 2000 and 1995.

    The key data sources are the National Graduates Surveys (NGS) of 1995, 2000 and 2005. Supplementary information is also provided by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the link between educational pathways and labour market outcomes of youth from all 5 cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS-Cohort B). The educational pathways are organized according to three major criteria: (1) No postsecondary education, (2) Direct route to postsecondary education, and (3) Indirect route to postsecondary education. Data from Cycle 5 of YITS, when youth were aged 26 to 28, provide a relatively complete examination of labour market outcomes as rising rates of participation in postsecondary education in Canada have led to a delay in entry into the labour market for many young adults. The current report focuses on two labour market outcomes full-year employment and annual earnings' at two different time points -- 1 to 2 years and 5 to 6 years after respondents have left school on a full-time basis. Results highlight the positive influence of a university education on labour market outcomes, especially several years after leaving school. Moreover, there is some weak evidence to suggest that university graduates who delayed going to a postsecondary program were more likely than their counterparts who had not delayed to be employed several years after leaving school.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010084
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The successful integration of immigrants into the Canadian labour market is of interest to Canadian public policy and to current and potential immigrants, alike. Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, this report aims to develop a better understanding of the integration of internationally-trained educated immigrants into the Canadian labour market compared to those (Canadian-born or other immigrants) who completed their education in Canada i.e., Are they working in an occupation related to their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What are their working conditions and earnings? In doing so, this report presents a socio-demographic profile of internationally-educated immigrants upon their arrival in Canada and examines their labour market outcomes by time elapsed since landing.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009074
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes the educational experiences, labour market outcomes and financing of higher education of recent graduates for Canadian postsecondary education institutions using data from the 2007 National Graduates Survey (Class of 2005). The first section describes the characteristics of graduates from college, bachelor, master and doctorate level programs. The second section focuses on experiences after graduation including pursuing further education and labour market activities. Section three presents information on the financing of postsecondary education, its relation to education level and labour market outcomes. The final section focuses on co-operative education and international studies and their relationship with labour market outcomes and student debt.

    Release date: 2009-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study focuses on the experience of students who consolidated their Canada student loans in loan year 1994-1995. It analyses a new database, which was created by linking Canada Student Loan Program records to income tax records from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD) and looks, in particular, at the relationships between debt size, income and default.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20
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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2012098
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report provides a profile of doctoral graduates from Ontario universities in the class of 2005 two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification. The report compares the Ontario results with the aggregate results for doctoral graduates from universities in the rest of Canada as well as results from 2 previous cohorts of graduates; i.e. the classes of 2000 and 1995.

    The key data sources are the National Graduates Surveys (NGS) of 1995, 2000 and 2005. Supplementary information is also provided by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the link between educational pathways and labour market outcomes of youth from all 5 cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS-Cohort B). The educational pathways are organized according to three major criteria: (1) No postsecondary education, (2) Direct route to postsecondary education, and (3) Indirect route to postsecondary education. Data from Cycle 5 of YITS, when youth were aged 26 to 28, provide a relatively complete examination of labour market outcomes as rising rates of participation in postsecondary education in Canada have led to a delay in entry into the labour market for many young adults. The current report focuses on two labour market outcomes full-year employment and annual earnings' at two different time points -- 1 to 2 years and 5 to 6 years after respondents have left school on a full-time basis. Results highlight the positive influence of a university education on labour market outcomes, especially several years after leaving school. Moreover, there is some weak evidence to suggest that university graduates who delayed going to a postsecondary program were more likely than their counterparts who had not delayed to be employed several years after leaving school.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010084
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The successful integration of immigrants into the Canadian labour market is of interest to Canadian public policy and to current and potential immigrants, alike. Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, this report aims to develop a better understanding of the integration of internationally-trained educated immigrants into the Canadian labour market compared to those (Canadian-born or other immigrants) who completed their education in Canada i.e., Are they working in an occupation related to their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What are their working conditions and earnings? In doing so, this report presents a socio-demographic profile of internationally-educated immigrants upon their arrival in Canada and examines their labour market outcomes by time elapsed since landing.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009074
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes the educational experiences, labour market outcomes and financing of higher education of recent graduates for Canadian postsecondary education institutions using data from the 2007 National Graduates Survey (Class of 2005). The first section describes the characteristics of graduates from college, bachelor, master and doctorate level programs. The second section focuses on experiences after graduation including pursuing further education and labour market activities. Section three presents information on the financing of postsecondary education, its relation to education level and labour market outcomes. The final section focuses on co-operative education and international studies and their relationship with labour market outcomes and student debt.

    Release date: 2009-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study focuses on the experience of students who consolidated their Canada student loans in loan year 1994-1995. It analyses a new database, which was created by linking Canada Student Loan Program records to income tax records from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD) and looks, in particular, at the relationships between debt size, income and default.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20
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Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2003009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how the Canadian Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) can be used to study participation in and impacts of education and training activities for adults.

    Release date: 2003-10-15
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