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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2017001
    Description:

    This report provides an up-to-date overview of the labour market involvement of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in Canada's ten provinces during and after the 2008/2009 economic downturn, as compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Using annual averages from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), covering the period of 2007 to 2015, the main focus is on Aboriginal people in the core working ages (25 to 54 years), although youth (aged 15 to 24 years) and older adults (aged 55 years and older) are considered separately. In addition to Aboriginal group, labour market indicators are distinguished by gender, geography (province/region of residence), education, lone parenthood, and marital status. The distribution of work characteristics (e.g., self-employment, sector of employment, usual work hours, wages, job tenure, industry, and occupation) by Aboriginal group are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-588-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the labour market conditions among the Aboriginal off-reserve populations, based on estimates from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the Aboriginal labour force characteristics by Aboriginal identity, as well as diverse socio-economic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08
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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2017001
    Description:

    This report provides an up-to-date overview of the labour market involvement of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in Canada's ten provinces during and after the 2008/2009 economic downturn, as compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Using annual averages from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), covering the period of 2007 to 2015, the main focus is on Aboriginal people in the core working ages (25 to 54 years), although youth (aged 15 to 24 years) and older adults (aged 55 years and older) are considered separately. In addition to Aboriginal group, labour market indicators are distinguished by gender, geography (province/region of residence), education, lone parenthood, and marital status. The distribution of work characteristics (e.g., self-employment, sector of employment, usual work hours, wages, job tenure, industry, and occupation) by Aboriginal group are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-588-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the labour market conditions among the Aboriginal off-reserve populations, based on estimates from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the Aboriginal labour force characteristics by Aboriginal identity, as well as diverse socio-economic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08
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