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  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016001
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The purpose of this analytical report is to identify the linkages among demographic trends, economic dynamics and literacy skills for New Brunswick francophones. The first part of the report presents the most recent profile of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills in a technology-rich environment as it relates to New Brunswick francophones, using the data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The first step is to assess the skill levels of New Brunswick francophones and to compare them against those of their anglophone counterparts and certain other francophone groups in Canada. The first section also endeavours to illustrate the major trends and specific factors that account for the gaps observed in the case of New Brunswick francophones.

    The second part of the report looks at the major demographic trends that characterize New Brunswick’s francophone population, focusing mainly on population aging, intraprovincial and interprovincial migration trends and the role of international immigration. These major trends are outlined, as are, more importantly, the ways they interact with the level of literacy and numeracy proficiency of the francophone population. The focus in the third part is similar in that it begins by detailing New Brunswick’s labour market and the role of francophones within it. The reciprocal influences among skills, demographic phenomena and the structure of the labour market documented therein shed light on the vicious circle that New Brunswick francophones find themselves in.

    Release date: 2016-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016377
    Description:

    It has been well documented that the children of immigrants in Canada outperform their peers with Canadian-born parents in educational attainment, and that the two groups have similar labour market outcomes. However, large variations by ethnicity or source country exist among the children of immigrants. This study examines the extent to which admission class (e.g., skilled workers, business immigrants, live-in caregivers, the family class and refugees) also matters in the socioeconomic outcomes of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada before the age of 18.

    Release date: 2016-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2016001
    Description:

    The 2011 Workplace Survey (WS) was an experimental survey funded by Employment and Social Development Canada. It was the first version of a cross-sectional survey that was to be conducted annually. It was meant to help improve the content and collection tools used for subsequent cycles. The survey covered job vacancies, among other things. According to that survey, there were 392,500 job vacancies in December 2011, representing 2.7% of all filled and unfilled positions in Canada that month. This article presents the results of the WS and examines whether the trends observed in the job vacancies are reflected in selected Labour Force Survey (LFS) indicators. Since the WS was a pilot survey and response rates varied depending on the question, some results cannot be provided.

    Release date: 2016-03-18

  • Table: 61-219-X
    Description:

    This publication contains annual aggregate data of Canadian enterprises classified by 67 industry groups. The industry breakdowns are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). The data include: asset, liability and equity items encompassed in a balance sheet, revenue and expense items as reported on an income statement, a reconciliation of net profit to taxable income and taxes payable, along with several common financial performance ratios.

    Release date: 2016-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 61-219-X
    Description:

    This publication contains annual aggregate data of Canadian enterprises classified by 67 industry groups. The industry breakdowns are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). The data include: asset, liability and equity items encompassed in a balance sheet, revenue and expense items as reported on an income statement, a reconciliation of net profit to taxable income and taxes payable, along with several common financial performance ratios.

    Release date: 2016-03-17
Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016001
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The purpose of this analytical report is to identify the linkages among demographic trends, economic dynamics and literacy skills for New Brunswick francophones. The first part of the report presents the most recent profile of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills in a technology-rich environment as it relates to New Brunswick francophones, using the data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The first step is to assess the skill levels of New Brunswick francophones and to compare them against those of their anglophone counterparts and certain other francophone groups in Canada. The first section also endeavours to illustrate the major trends and specific factors that account for the gaps observed in the case of New Brunswick francophones.

    The second part of the report looks at the major demographic trends that characterize New Brunswick’s francophone population, focusing mainly on population aging, intraprovincial and interprovincial migration trends and the role of international immigration. These major trends are outlined, as are, more importantly, the ways they interact with the level of literacy and numeracy proficiency of the francophone population. The focus in the third part is similar in that it begins by detailing New Brunswick’s labour market and the role of francophones within it. The reciprocal influences among skills, demographic phenomena and the structure of the labour market documented therein shed light on the vicious circle that New Brunswick francophones find themselves in.

    Release date: 2016-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016377
    Description:

    It has been well documented that the children of immigrants in Canada outperform their peers with Canadian-born parents in educational attainment, and that the two groups have similar labour market outcomes. However, large variations by ethnicity or source country exist among the children of immigrants. This study examines the extent to which admission class (e.g., skilled workers, business immigrants, live-in caregivers, the family class and refugees) also matters in the socioeconomic outcomes of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada before the age of 18.

    Release date: 2016-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2016001
    Description:

    The 2011 Workplace Survey (WS) was an experimental survey funded by Employment and Social Development Canada. It was the first version of a cross-sectional survey that was to be conducted annually. It was meant to help improve the content and collection tools used for subsequent cycles. The survey covered job vacancies, among other things. According to that survey, there were 392,500 job vacancies in December 2011, representing 2.7% of all filled and unfilled positions in Canada that month. This article presents the results of the WS and examines whether the trends observed in the job vacancies are reflected in selected Labour Force Survey (LFS) indicators. Since the WS was a pilot survey and response rates varied depending on the question, some results cannot be provided.

    Release date: 2016-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07
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