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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044755
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In addition to the Survey of Consumer Finances, the Labour Force Survey now provides a way of comparing women's earnings with men's. The tow measures are explained here, as are the reasons for the sizable gap between them.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015023
    Description:

    The study of social mobility, between labour market statuses or between income levels, for example, is often based on the analysis of mobility matrices. When comparing these transition matrices, with a view to evaluating behavioural changes, one often forgets that the data derive from a sample survey and are therefore affected by sampling variances. Similarly, it is assumed that the responses collected correspond to the ' true value.'

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015032
    Description:

    The objective of this research project is to examine the long-term consequences of being raised in a single parent household. We examine the impact of parental separation or divorce on the adult labour market behaviour of children ten to fifteen years after the event. In particular, we relate the family income and household characteristics of a cohort of individuals who are 16 to 19 years of age in 1982 to their labour market earnings, reliance on social transfers (UI and Income Assistance), and marital/fertility outcomes during the early 1990s, when they are in their late 20s and early 30s. Our data is based upon the linked income tax records developed by us at Statistics Canada, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0116X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report "Inequalities in literacy skills among youth in Canada and the United States", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. This report suggests that youth in North America do not fare as well in their literacy skills as their European counterparts. Variables such as income and education continue to have direct and indirect effects on people's literacy skills.

    Release date: 1999-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M1999006
    Description:

    Although income and expenditure data provide an indication of current consumption and ability to purchase goods and services, they provide little information on the long-term ability of families to sustain themselves. The results of this survey will provide information on the net worth (wealth) of Canadian families, that is, the value of their assets less their debts.

    This paper examines the objectives of the survey, how the survey has changed since 1984, the types of questions being asked and information that will be provided, as well as other survey background. An accompanying table outlines the content of the questionnaire. The intent of this paper is to describe the work done to date and the next steps for this important subject.

    Release date: 1999-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1999006
    Description:

    This paper explores the management development profiles of mid-to-senior level managers of the Canadian Red Cross Society.

    Release date: 1999-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1999006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the general finding that Canadian youth from higher socio-economic backgrounds tend to perform better on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) than do youth from disadvantaged backgrounds. It also looks at whether this applies to states within the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034683
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Have baby boom women had an easier path through the labour market than women a generation older or younger? This article studies the "success" of baby boom women by looking at their situation in 1977 and 1997 and comparing it with that of the preceding and succeeding generations, using four major indicators: labour force participation; full-time employment; unemployment; and full-year full-time earnings.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999135
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Two quasi-experiments are used to estimate the impact of parental divorce on the adult incomes and labour market behaviour of adolescents, as well as on their use of social programs, and their marital/fertility behaviour. These involve the use of individuals experiencing the death of a parent, and legislative changes to the Canadian divorce law in 1986. Parental loss by death is assumed to be exogenous; the experiences of children with a bereaved background offering a benchmark to assess the endogeneity of parental loss through divorce. Differences between individuals with divorced parents and those from intact and bereaved families significantly overstate the impact of divorce across a broad range of outcomes. When background characteristics are controlled for-most notably the income and labour market activity of parents in the years leading up to the divorce-parental divorce seems to influence the marital and fertility decisions of children, but not their labour market outcomes. Adolescents whose parents divorced tend to put off marriage, and once married suffer a greater likelihood of marital instability, but their earnings and incomes are not on average much different from others.

    Release date: 1999-06-09
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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044755
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In addition to the Survey of Consumer Finances, the Labour Force Survey now provides a way of comparing women's earnings with men's. The tow measures are explained here, as are the reasons for the sizable gap between them.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0116X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report "Inequalities in literacy skills among youth in Canada and the United States", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. This report suggests that youth in North America do not fare as well in their literacy skills as their European counterparts. Variables such as income and education continue to have direct and indirect effects on people's literacy skills.

    Release date: 1999-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1999006
    Description:

    This paper explores the management development profiles of mid-to-senior level managers of the Canadian Red Cross Society.

    Release date: 1999-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1999006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the general finding that Canadian youth from higher socio-economic backgrounds tend to perform better on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) than do youth from disadvantaged backgrounds. It also looks at whether this applies to states within the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034683
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Have baby boom women had an easier path through the labour market than women a generation older or younger? This article studies the "success" of baby boom women by looking at their situation in 1977 and 1997 and comparing it with that of the preceding and succeeding generations, using four major indicators: labour force participation; full-time employment; unemployment; and full-year full-time earnings.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999135
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Two quasi-experiments are used to estimate the impact of parental divorce on the adult incomes and labour market behaviour of adolescents, as well as on their use of social programs, and their marital/fertility behaviour. These involve the use of individuals experiencing the death of a parent, and legislative changes to the Canadian divorce law in 1986. Parental loss by death is assumed to be exogenous; the experiences of children with a bereaved background offering a benchmark to assess the endogeneity of parental loss through divorce. Differences between individuals with divorced parents and those from intact and bereaved families significantly overstate the impact of divorce across a broad range of outcomes. When background characteristics are controlled for-most notably the income and labour market activity of parents in the years leading up to the divorce-parental divorce seems to influence the marital and fertility decisions of children, but not their labour market outcomes. Adolescents whose parents divorced tend to put off marriage, and once married suffer a greater likelihood of marital instability, but their earnings and incomes are not on average much different from others.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999133
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper highlights recent developments in self-employment in Canada and explores its relationship to unemployment/full-time paid-employment. There are now two and a half million Canadians working at their own businesses, amounting to 16.2% of the total labour force or accounting for 17.8% of total employment. In the first eight years of the 1990s, self-employment on average expanded by 4.1% per year, contributing to over three out of four new jobs the economy has created. Entry and exit data demonstrate that there are substantial flows into and out of this sector of the economy. Gross flows into and out of self-employment as the main labour market activity averaged nearly half a million per year between 1982 and 1994, amounting to 42% of the total self-employed population.

    The fixed-effects modelling results show a statistically significant but empirically small negative (positive) relationship between self-employment and unemployment (full-time paid- employment). This conclusion holds true across different data sources, for different time periods, for different measures and definitions, for different empirical samples, and across various estimating techniques. There is also a statistically significant but empirically small negative (positive) relationship between exits out of self-employment and unemployment (full-time paid- employment). It appears that a host of non-cyclical factors are behind the recent surge in self-employment.

    Release date: 1999-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999132
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Child poverty is high on the government's agenda. In order to reduce the rate of low-income among children, one has to either reduce the number of children flowing into low-income, or increase the number flowing out. But what is behind such movement? Most analysts would immediately think of job loss among the parents, but obviously divorce and remarriage can also play a role. In order to favourably alter the flows, one has to have some understanding of what is driving them. This paper asks to what extent this movement of children is determined by (1) changes in family status of the parents of children, or (2) changes in the parent's labour market conditions (i.e. job loss and gain, changes in hours of work or wages). We find that for an individual child, a divorce or marriage can have a tremendous influence on the likelihood of entering or exiting low-income. At the level of the individual, changes in family composition (when they occur) are more important than changes in jobs held by parents. However, changes in family status are relatively infrequent compared to labour market changes. Parents are much more likely to lose or find jobs, and experience changes in hours worked or wages, than they are to marry or divorce. When this is accounted for we find that, in the aggregate, flows of children into and out of low income are associated roughly equally with family compositional changes and changes in wages and hours worked.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034471
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Earlier this decade, labour market conditions for young Canadians aged 15-24 deteriorated significantly. In the late 1980s, youths were more likely to be working than were adults. By 1997, only about half were employed, almost ten percentage points less than adults. Furthermore, when they did find work, youths today are more likely to be working part-time compared to adults and compared to yourths at the start of the decade, leading to reduced pay.

    Release date: 1999-03-31
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015023
    Description:

    The study of social mobility, between labour market statuses or between income levels, for example, is often based on the analysis of mobility matrices. When comparing these transition matrices, with a view to evaluating behavioural changes, one often forgets that the data derive from a sample survey and are therefore affected by sampling variances. Similarly, it is assumed that the responses collected correspond to the ' true value.'

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015032
    Description:

    The objective of this research project is to examine the long-term consequences of being raised in a single parent household. We examine the impact of parental separation or divorce on the adult labour market behaviour of children ten to fifteen years after the event. In particular, we relate the family income and household characteristics of a cohort of individuals who are 16 to 19 years of age in 1982 to their labour market earnings, reliance on social transfers (UI and Income Assistance), and marital/fertility outcomes during the early 1990s, when they are in their late 20s and early 30s. Our data is based upon the linked income tax records developed by us at Statistics Canada, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M1999006
    Description:

    Although income and expenditure data provide an indication of current consumption and ability to purchase goods and services, they provide little information on the long-term ability of families to sustain themselves. The results of this survey will provide information on the net worth (wealth) of Canadian families, that is, the value of their assets less their debts.

    This paper examines the objectives of the survey, how the survey has changed since 1984, the types of questions being asked and information that will be provided, as well as other survey background. An accompanying table outlines the content of the questionnaire. The intent of this paper is to describe the work done to date and the next steps for this important subject.

    Release date: 1999-09-27

  • Notices and consultations: 13F0026M1999001
    Description:

    The main objectives of a new Canadian survey measuring asset and debt holding of families and individuals will be to update wealth information that is over one decade old; to improve the reliability of the wealth estimates; and, to provide a primary tool for analysing many important policy issues related to the distribution of assets and debts, future consumption possibilities, and savings behaviour that is of interest to governments, business and communities.

    This paper is the document that launched the development of the new asset and debt survey, subsequently renamed the Survey of Financial Security. It looks at the conceptual framework for the survey, including the appropriate unit of measurement (family, household or person) and discusses measurement issues such as establishing an accounting framework for assets and debts. The variables proposed for inclusion are also identified. The paper poses several questions to readers and asks for comments and feedback.

    Release date: 1999-03-23

  • Notices and consultations: 13F0026M1999002
    Description:

    This document summarizes the comments and feedback received on an earlier document: Towards a new Canadian asset and debt survey - A content discussion paper. The new asset and debt survey (now called the Survey of Financial Security) is to update the wealth information on Canadian families and unattached individuals. Since the last data collection was conducted in 1984, it was essential to include a consultative process in the development of the survey in order to obtain feedback on issues of concern and to define the conceptual framework for the survey.

    Comments on the content discussion paper are summarized by major theme and sections indicate how the suggestions are being incorporated into the survey or why they could not be incorporated. This paper also mentions the main objectives of the survey and provides an overview of the survey content, revised according to the feedback from the discussion paper.

    Release date: 1999-03-23
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