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  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1996008
    Description:

    This paper studies the growth in inequality in weekly earnings in Canada and the factors that contribute to it.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1997012
    Description:

    This paper presents data collected from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary interview on a person's work experience: years of full-time work, part-time work and no work. It uses these data to study the effect of Labour market intermittency (or time not in a full-time job) on current employment earnings.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997106
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper documents job turnover and labour market adjustment activities in the Ontario economy from 1978 to 1993. The following highlights the major findings. Both the permanent layoff rate and the total permanent separation rate vary substantially from one industry to another. In 1992, the permanent layoff and total permanent separation rates ranged from 27.3% and 34.2% in construction to only 1.4% and 9.3% in public services, respectively. The permanent layoff rate and the total permanent separation rate also differ noticeably by gender, age and firm size - in most industries, the rates are higher among male workers than among females, higher among younger workers, and higher among smaller employers.

    While the permanent layoff rate increases during business cycle downturns and decreases during business cycle upswings, the reverse trend is observed with the total permanent separation rate. This is because the quit rate and the other permanent separation rate both decline during downturns and rise during upswings, more than offsetting the opposite trend associated with the permanent layoff rate.

    These univariate-tabulation findings are confirmed in the multi-variate logistic regression results on the statistical determinants of permanent layoffs and total permanent separations. In most industries, after controlling for gender, age, firm size and time periods, the estimated likelihood of permanent layoffs is lower among female workers, decreases significantly with age and firm size, increases during recessions and decreases during recovery and expansion in most industries. The patterns of estimated incidence of total permanent separations are very similar to those of permanent layoffs except that total permanent separations decline during business cycle downturns and climb during business cycle upswings.

    Permanently separated workers have had a much more difficult time in finding employment during the most recent recession than any other time in the past 15 years. Almost 40% of those who lost or left a job in 1989 did not have a job in 1993. This is in marked contrast with the experience of the early 1980s, when 29% of permanently separated workers were jobless 3 years after the separation. A very similar trend is found when the analysis is applied to labour market transitions among permanently laid-off workers.

    There is a great deal of out-of-province migration among permanently separated workers who did find a job. Nearly 45% of those who lost or left a job in 1989 and found a job in 1993 were employed outside of Ontario. An identical proportion of permanently laid-off workers is found to be employed in other provinces.

    Release date: 1997-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Around the beginning of the year, analysts were predicting that1997 would be a good year for the Canadian economy and labourmarket. Is it living up to expectations? This review examinestrends and developments in the labour market during the firsthalf of 1997. (This article appeared as an advance release inJuly 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1997001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the distribution of literacy skills for Canadian youth aged 16 to 25, and the underlying factors that influence literacy, such as family background, level of schooling, employment experiences, age and sex.

    Release date: 1997-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fundamental changes have taken place in the labour market and among firms in the 1980s and 1990s. In some cases we understand what has occurred, but notwhy. In other cases the data do not exist to shed light on exactly what is happening, let alone why. Changes in the labour market are often related to changes in theway in which firms are engaging and paying labour, the adoption of new technologies, changes in the types of markets in which firms compete, and other eventsoccurring in firms; i.e. changes on the demand side of the labour market. But data have never existed that allowed events occurring in firms to be related to theoutcomes for the workers. This paper outlines why such data are necessary. The example of rising inequality is used to demonstrate the need for such a survey. Alsopresented is an outline of how the new data can be provided using a new approach to surveying. The proposed survey first surveys establishments, and then surveysworkers within that establishment. In this way a direct link is made between the activities in the establishment and the outcomes for the workers. Conversely, a directlink is established between the events in the firm and the characteristics of the workers, another area of research that has suffered from a lack of data at themicro-level. This paper outlines why such a survey is needed, the possible content, and research topics that could be addressed with such data.

    Release date: 1997-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012989
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    How has 1996 performed compared with 1995 and 1994? This year-end review examines changes and trends in the labour market over the past year. (This article appeared as an advance release in January 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043221
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article previews the findings of the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey. The information will interest people in areas such as education or youth employment: policy makers, community advocates, teachers, counsellors, administrators, and young people themselves. Included is basic information about the education, training and labour market experiences of youth during the first few years after leaving or graduating from high school. A comprehensive report on school-work transitions among youth will follow later in 1997.

    Release date: 1997-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043223
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unpredictability" and "transformation" are words often used to describe the contemporary labour market. Debate continues about the implications of the disruption of stable career and work patterns which were assumed to have been the norm in the Canadian workplace. Teaching, because it is the largest profession in Canada, is a useful venue for examining these labour market dynamics, especially transitions into and out of the profession. These entry and exit transitions, which are the central theme of this paper, are also of interest in a profession like teaching where university graduates have traditionally enjoyed a tight link to an established labour market.

    Release date: 1997-01-27
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Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1996008
    Description:

    This paper studies the growth in inequality in weekly earnings in Canada and the factors that contribute to it.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1997012
    Description:

    This paper presents data collected from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary interview on a person's work experience: years of full-time work, part-time work and no work. It uses these data to study the effect of Labour market intermittency (or time not in a full-time job) on current employment earnings.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997106
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper documents job turnover and labour market adjustment activities in the Ontario economy from 1978 to 1993. The following highlights the major findings. Both the permanent layoff rate and the total permanent separation rate vary substantially from one industry to another. In 1992, the permanent layoff and total permanent separation rates ranged from 27.3% and 34.2% in construction to only 1.4% and 9.3% in public services, respectively. The permanent layoff rate and the total permanent separation rate also differ noticeably by gender, age and firm size - in most industries, the rates are higher among male workers than among females, higher among younger workers, and higher among smaller employers.

    While the permanent layoff rate increases during business cycle downturns and decreases during business cycle upswings, the reverse trend is observed with the total permanent separation rate. This is because the quit rate and the other permanent separation rate both decline during downturns and rise during upswings, more than offsetting the opposite trend associated with the permanent layoff rate.

    These univariate-tabulation findings are confirmed in the multi-variate logistic regression results on the statistical determinants of permanent layoffs and total permanent separations. In most industries, after controlling for gender, age, firm size and time periods, the estimated likelihood of permanent layoffs is lower among female workers, decreases significantly with age and firm size, increases during recessions and decreases during recovery and expansion in most industries. The patterns of estimated incidence of total permanent separations are very similar to those of permanent layoffs except that total permanent separations decline during business cycle downturns and climb during business cycle upswings.

    Permanently separated workers have had a much more difficult time in finding employment during the most recent recession than any other time in the past 15 years. Almost 40% of those who lost or left a job in 1989 did not have a job in 1993. This is in marked contrast with the experience of the early 1980s, when 29% of permanently separated workers were jobless 3 years after the separation. A very similar trend is found when the analysis is applied to labour market transitions among permanently laid-off workers.

    There is a great deal of out-of-province migration among permanently separated workers who did find a job. Nearly 45% of those who lost or left a job in 1989 and found a job in 1993 were employed outside of Ontario. An identical proportion of permanently laid-off workers is found to be employed in other provinces.

    Release date: 1997-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Around the beginning of the year, analysts were predicting that1997 would be a good year for the Canadian economy and labourmarket. Is it living up to expectations? This review examinestrends and developments in the labour market during the firsthalf of 1997. (This article appeared as an advance release inJuly 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1997001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the distribution of literacy skills for Canadian youth aged 16 to 25, and the underlying factors that influence literacy, such as family background, level of schooling, employment experiences, age and sex.

    Release date: 1997-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fundamental changes have taken place in the labour market and among firms in the 1980s and 1990s. In some cases we understand what has occurred, but notwhy. In other cases the data do not exist to shed light on exactly what is happening, let alone why. Changes in the labour market are often related to changes in theway in which firms are engaging and paying labour, the adoption of new technologies, changes in the types of markets in which firms compete, and other eventsoccurring in firms; i.e. changes on the demand side of the labour market. But data have never existed that allowed events occurring in firms to be related to theoutcomes for the workers. This paper outlines why such data are necessary. The example of rising inequality is used to demonstrate the need for such a survey. Alsopresented is an outline of how the new data can be provided using a new approach to surveying. The proposed survey first surveys establishments, and then surveysworkers within that establishment. In this way a direct link is made between the activities in the establishment and the outcomes for the workers. Conversely, a directlink is established between the events in the firm and the characteristics of the workers, another area of research that has suffered from a lack of data at themicro-level. This paper outlines why such a survey is needed, the possible content, and research topics that could be addressed with such data.

    Release date: 1997-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012989
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    How has 1996 performed compared with 1995 and 1994? This year-end review examines changes and trends in the labour market over the past year. (This article appeared as an advance release in January 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043221
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article previews the findings of the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey. The information will interest people in areas such as education or youth employment: policy makers, community advocates, teachers, counsellors, administrators, and young people themselves. Included is basic information about the education, training and labour market experiences of youth during the first few years after leaving or graduating from high school. A comprehensive report on school-work transitions among youth will follow later in 1997.

    Release date: 1997-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043223
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unpredictability" and "transformation" are words often used to describe the contemporary labour market. Debate continues about the implications of the disruption of stable career and work patterns which were assumed to have been the norm in the Canadian workplace. Teaching, because it is the largest profession in Canada, is a useful venue for examining these labour market dynamics, especially transitions into and out of the profession. These entry and exit transitions, which are the central theme of this paper, are also of interest in a profession like teaching where university graduates have traditionally enjoyed a tight link to an established labour market.

    Release date: 1997-01-27
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