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  • Journals and periodicals: 85-002-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This publication provides in-depth analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of topics and issues related to justice and public safety. Topics include crime, victimization, homicide, civil, family and criminal courts, and correctional services. Issues related to community safety, and perceptions of safety are also covered. The publication is intended for those with an interest in Canada's justice and public safety systems as well as those who plan, establish, administer and evaluate programs and projects related to justice and public safety.
    Release date: 2024-04-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-005-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This publication features short, informative articles focusing on specific justice-related issues. For more in-depth articles on justice in Canada, see also Juristat, Catalogue no. 85-002-X.
    Release date: 2023-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 41-20-00022023003
    Description: Using data from the 2021 Canadian Legal Problems Survey (CLPS), this article examines the types of serious problems experienced by off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit adults (aged 18 years and older) in the provinces. In addition, various socio-demographic characteristics and their association with the experience of one or more serious problems are examined using bivariate and multivariate analyses.
    Release date: 2023-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400114085
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin examines characteristics and trends of verdicts of not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in adult criminal courts. The number and rate of cases over time, type of offence, age and sex of the accused, and case completion time are described. Data are from the Integrated Criminal Court Survey (ICCS), administered by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics at Statistics Canada. This article examines completed cases where at least one charge received a final decision of NCRMD, in ten reporting Canadian provinces and territories from 2005/2006 to 2011/2012.

    Release date: 2014-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111899
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2011/2012, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 24, 2012. The 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Justice surveys represent a unique type of survey undertaken by Statistics Canada. While they all essentially use administrative data, Statistics Canada has had considerable input into the type of data that is collected as well as quality assurance methods guiding the collection of this data. This is true in the areas of policing, courts and corrections. The main crime survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR), is the focus of this paper and was designed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics. The data is collected by the policing community in Canada and transmitted electronically to Statistics Canada. This paper will begin by providing an overview of the survey and its distinctive properties, such as the use of intermediaries (software vendors) that convert data from the police's information systems into the UCR survey format, following nationally defined data requirements. This level of consistency is uncommon for an administrative survey and permits a variety of opportunities for improving the overall data quality and capabilities of the survey. Various methods such as quality indicators and feedback reports are used on a regular basis and frequent two-way communication takes place with the respondents to correct existing data problems and to prevent future ones. We will discuss recent improvements to both the data itself and our collection methods that have enhanced the usability of the survey. Finally, future development of the survey will be discussed including some of the challenges that currently exist as well as those still to come.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110643
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization. This survey collected information on the extent and nature of self-reported criminal victimization, the impact and consequences of crime to the victim, reporting to the police and the use of informal and formal services. Similar surveys on victimization were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-569-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Table: 85-567-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the administration of community-based correctional services in Canada for adults and youth, which include, but are not limited to probation, conditional sentences, and temporary absence programs. Although the Criminal Code of Canada, the Young Offenders Act and the Youth Criminal Justice Act set out guidelines, jurisdictions are not obliged to follow them directly. Jurisdictions will differ, sometimes substantially, in their administration.

    This publication provides a descriptive overview of sentences and the delivery of community correctional services across all jurisdictions in Canada for both adult and youth. In addition, this publication reports on community corrections data collected from the special study, as well as data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey, the Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, and the Alternative Measures Survey. It examines admissions and average counts of adults and youth who were under community supervision, showing trends as far back as 1993/94. Furthermore, data on offender characteristics, such as sex and Aboriginal status are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Table: 85F0027X
    Description:

    Bulletins are short documents that provide information or statistics on important justice related topics. The articles cover current issues in justice such as impaired driving, youth and crime, intermittent sentencing, criminal harassment, etc.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

  • Table: 85-403-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents data from the Courts Personnel and Expenditure Survey including national totals and jurisdictional information on personnel (judiciary and court staff); judiciary by level of court; expenditures by type (i.e. salaries and benefits); and operating expenditures (i.e. law library/publication costs, witness costs). The survey is administered on a biennial basis and this year's report covers data for the 2000/01 fiscal year.

    Release date: 2002-05-16

  • Table: 85-402-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents highlights from the Criminal Prosecutions Personnel and Expenditures Survey including national totals and jurisdictional information on type of staff; use of contract lawyers; expenditures by type (i.e. salaries and benefits, administrative services, etc.); and the types of services provided, (e.g. specialized services versus general duties). The survey is administered on a biennial basis, be reporting data for the 2000-01 fiscal year.

    Release date: 2002-04-17
Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-002-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This publication provides in-depth analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of topics and issues related to justice and public safety. Topics include crime, victimization, homicide, civil, family and criminal courts, and correctional services. Issues related to community safety, and perceptions of safety are also covered. The publication is intended for those with an interest in Canada's justice and public safety systems as well as those who plan, establish, administer and evaluate programs and projects related to justice and public safety.
    Release date: 2024-04-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-005-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This publication features short, informative articles focusing on specific justice-related issues. For more in-depth articles on justice in Canada, see also Juristat, Catalogue no. 85-002-X.
    Release date: 2023-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 41-20-00022023003
    Description: Using data from the 2021 Canadian Legal Problems Survey (CLPS), this article examines the types of serious problems experienced by off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit adults (aged 18 years and older) in the provinces. In addition, various socio-demographic characteristics and their association with the experience of one or more serious problems are examined using bivariate and multivariate analyses.
    Release date: 2023-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400114085
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin examines characteristics and trends of verdicts of not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in adult criminal courts. The number and rate of cases over time, type of offence, age and sex of the accused, and case completion time are described. Data are from the Integrated Criminal Court Survey (ICCS), administered by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics at Statistics Canada. This article examines completed cases where at least one charge received a final decision of NCRMD, in ten reporting Canadian provinces and territories from 2005/2006 to 2011/2012.

    Release date: 2014-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111899
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2011/2012, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 24, 2012. The 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Justice surveys represent a unique type of survey undertaken by Statistics Canada. While they all essentially use administrative data, Statistics Canada has had considerable input into the type of data that is collected as well as quality assurance methods guiding the collection of this data. This is true in the areas of policing, courts and corrections. The main crime survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR), is the focus of this paper and was designed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics. The data is collected by the policing community in Canada and transmitted electronically to Statistics Canada. This paper will begin by providing an overview of the survey and its distinctive properties, such as the use of intermediaries (software vendors) that convert data from the police's information systems into the UCR survey format, following nationally defined data requirements. This level of consistency is uncommon for an administrative survey and permits a variety of opportunities for improving the overall data quality and capabilities of the survey. Various methods such as quality indicators and feedback reports are used on a regular basis and frequent two-way communication takes place with the respondents to correct existing data problems and to prevent future ones. We will discuss recent improvements to both the data itself and our collection methods that have enhanced the usability of the survey. Finally, future development of the survey will be discussed including some of the challenges that currently exist as well as those still to come.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110643
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization. This survey collected information on the extent and nature of self-reported criminal victimization, the impact and consequences of crime to the victim, reporting to the police and the use of informal and formal services. Similar surveys on victimization were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-569-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050078803
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization. The impacts and consequences of being victimized are discussed, along with the informal and formal sources of support for victims.

    Release date: 2005-11-24
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