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All (31)

All (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154982
    Description:

    Harassment in the workplace can come in a variety of forms, with the potential for far-reaching effects on the health and well-being of workers, as well as on their job tenure, job stability and job satisfaction. Using data from 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home (GSS), this study focuses on workplace harassment experienced by respondents at some point in the past year. The target population includes those who were aged 15 to 64 and worked for pay in the past year.

    Release date: 2018-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018408
    Description:

    This paper investigates the effect of unemployment on life satisfaction from a comparative perspective. It also tests whether the link between unemployment and life satisfaction is moderated or reinforced by contextual unemployment across regions within a country—either through a negative spillover or a positive social-norm effect, or both.

    Release date: 2018-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • 7. On sick leave Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413162
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some 720,000 work absences of two weeks or longer due to illness or disability were reported in 2003, 200,000 of which were work-related. With a median duration of 11 weeks, each of these long-term absences costs roughly $8,800. Furthermore, absences lasting upwards of four months were generally associated with negative health, stress, career stagnation, and heightened chances of being on leave again the following year.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510813148
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

    Release date: 2005-09-21
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29
Analysis (30)

Analysis (30) (0 to 10 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154982
    Description:

    Harassment in the workplace can come in a variety of forms, with the potential for far-reaching effects on the health and well-being of workers, as well as on their job tenure, job stability and job satisfaction. Using data from 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home (GSS), this study focuses on workplace harassment experienced by respondents at some point in the past year. The target population includes those who were aged 15 to 64 and worked for pay in the past year.

    Release date: 2018-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018408
    Description:

    This paper investigates the effect of unemployment on life satisfaction from a comparative perspective. It also tests whether the link between unemployment and life satisfaction is moderated or reinforced by contextual unemployment across regions within a country—either through a negative spillover or a positive social-norm effect, or both.

    Release date: 2018-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • 7. On sick leave Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413162
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some 720,000 work absences of two weeks or longer due to illness or disability were reported in 2003, 200,000 of which were work-related. With a median duration of 11 weeks, each of these long-term absences costs roughly $8,800. Furthermore, absences lasting upwards of four months were generally associated with negative health, stress, career stagnation, and heightened chances of being on leave again the following year.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510813148
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

    Release date: 2005-09-21
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