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All (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154975
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to provide information on individuals looking for work even if they are already employed. The study examines the reasons why workers want to look for a new job. The paper also explores the links between looking for a job while employed, the characteristics of workers seeking a new job and their level of job satisfaction.

    Release date: 2018-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311698
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the job-search behaviour of the older unemployed by comparing it with that of their younger counterparts, using data from the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey from 2006 to 2010. It looks at age differences in the number of hours spent looking for work and the methods used. It also examines two aspects that may affect the probability of finding a job quickly - looking for work outside one's community and the willingness of the unemployed to accept job offers with a lower wage than in the previous job. Lastly, it examines the level of optimism of the older unemployed about their chances of finding an acceptable job quickly, as well as what, in their view, would help them most in their efforts.

    Release date: 2012-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992004
    Description:

    The accurate measurement of job search and unemployment has been a recurring problem in retrospective surveys. However, strategies to improve recall in such surveys have not been especially successful. Proposed solutions have included a) reducing the recall period and b) questioning whether the standard operationalization of labour force concepts is appropriate in a retrospective setting.

    One difficulty in arriving at an appropriate line of questioning is that there does not exist a reliable benchmark source indicating what sort of search patterns one should be observing over the year. Current notions of labour force dynamics have been heavily influenced by linked-record gross change data, which for various reasons cannot be considered a reliable source. These data show numerous changes in status from month-to-month and generally paint a picture of labour force participation that suggests little behavioural consistency.

    This study examines data from the Annual Work Patterns Survey (AWPS) and Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS). It shows that the underreporting of job search in the AWPS (and to a lesser extent in the LMAS) is closely connected to the failure of respondents, in a significant number of cases, to report any job search prior to the start of a job, a problem for which there is a simple questionnaire solution.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992006
    Description:

    Labour force status will be an important analytical variable for many users of SLID data. The document discusses the issues involved in deriving this variable, and details the approach to be adopted.

    Briefly, a value will be assigned for every one-week period, with three possibilities: employed, unemployed and not in the labour force. To a large extent, concepts used in the Canadian Labour Force Survey will be used. Since there are several situations where a straightforward approach to the classification is not possible, additional information will be available to data users who wish to adjust the definitions used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • 75C0002
    Description:

    Custom data retrievals may be ordered directly from Income Statistics Division staff at Statistics Canada, as an alternative to using the public use microdata or to obtain detail that is not available on the public use file. All custom products are reviewed for confidentiality of respondent information and data reliability; some suppression of information may be required as a result of this review. Prices for custom products reflect the full cost of producing them. Consultation with Income staff about custom outputs is offered free of charge.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the growth in tourism employment in rural Canada over the period 1996 to 2003.

    Release date: 2005-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313116
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although minimum wage workers are often young people living with their parents, other workers in this category are trying to support families. To evaluate the effects of a change in the minimum wage, it is essential to know who work for minimum wage and the types of jobs they hold.

    Release date: 2004-06-14
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 89M0013X
    Description:

    This public use microdata file provides unaggregated data on the Aboriginal adult population - those who identify with their Aboriginal origin(s) and those who do not. For persons who identify, it contains almost 700 variables from the 1991 survey, such as, the group with which they identify, language proficiency, disability, chronic health conditions, schooling, work experience and the 1991 Census variables such as, income levels, marital status, fertility. The same census variables are provided for the population who does not identify.

    Release date: 1995-06-30
Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154975
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to provide information on individuals looking for work even if they are already employed. The study examines the reasons why workers want to look for a new job. The paper also explores the links between looking for a job while employed, the characteristics of workers seeking a new job and their level of job satisfaction.

    Release date: 2018-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311698
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the job-search behaviour of the older unemployed by comparing it with that of their younger counterparts, using data from the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey from 2006 to 2010. It looks at age differences in the number of hours spent looking for work and the methods used. It also examines two aspects that may affect the probability of finding a job quickly - looking for work outside one's community and the willingness of the unemployed to accept job offers with a lower wage than in the previous job. Lastly, it examines the level of optimism of the older unemployed about their chances of finding an acceptable job quickly, as well as what, in their view, would help them most in their efforts.

    Release date: 2012-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992004
    Description:

    The accurate measurement of job search and unemployment has been a recurring problem in retrospective surveys. However, strategies to improve recall in such surveys have not been especially successful. Proposed solutions have included a) reducing the recall period and b) questioning whether the standard operationalization of labour force concepts is appropriate in a retrospective setting.

    One difficulty in arriving at an appropriate line of questioning is that there does not exist a reliable benchmark source indicating what sort of search patterns one should be observing over the year. Current notions of labour force dynamics have been heavily influenced by linked-record gross change data, which for various reasons cannot be considered a reliable source. These data show numerous changes in status from month-to-month and generally paint a picture of labour force participation that suggests little behavioural consistency.

    This study examines data from the Annual Work Patterns Survey (AWPS) and Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS). It shows that the underreporting of job search in the AWPS (and to a lesser extent in the LMAS) is closely connected to the failure of respondents, in a significant number of cases, to report any job search prior to the start of a job, a problem for which there is a simple questionnaire solution.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992006
    Description:

    Labour force status will be an important analytical variable for many users of SLID data. The document discusses the issues involved in deriving this variable, and details the approach to be adopted.

    Briefly, a value will be assigned for every one-week period, with three possibilities: employed, unemployed and not in the labour force. To a large extent, concepts used in the Canadian Labour Force Survey will be used. Since there are several situations where a straightforward approach to the classification is not possible, additional information will be available to data users who wish to adjust the definitions used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the growth in tourism employment in rural Canada over the period 1996 to 2003.

    Release date: 2005-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313116
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although minimum wage workers are often young people living with their parents, other workers in this category are trying to support families. To evaluate the effects of a change in the minimum wage, it is essential to know who work for minimum wage and the types of jobs they hold.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413118
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the costs of long-term unemployment. In economic terms, it leads to lower tax revenues, lower productivity and costlier social and health care programs. On a personal level, it is associated with financial difficulties, loss of self-esteem and health problems.

    Release date: 2004-06-14
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