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All (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Table: 15-207-X
    Description:

    The symmetric industry by industry input-output tables show inter-industry transactions, that is, all purchases of an industry from all other industries as well as expenditures on imports and the components of value added such as wages and gross operating surplus. Similarly, the symmetric final demand tables show all purchases by each final demand category from all industries as well as expenditures on imports. The symmetric input-output tables are analytically derived from the industry by product supply and use tables. The tables are available at the Detail level and at the Link 1997, Link 1961 and Summary aggregations.

    Release date: 2019-01-03

  • Table: 15-208-X
    Description:

    The Industry Accounts Division of Statistics Canada publishes annual supply and use input-output (I-O) tables. While these rectangular, industry by commodity closely reflect actual economic transactions, certain analytical and modeling purposes, however, require symmetric industry-by-industry I-O tables. The symmetric industry by industry table shows the inter-industry transactions, that is, all purchases of an industry from all other industries including expenditures on imports and inventory withdrawals as well as all expenditures on primary inputs. Similarly, the symmetric final demand table shows all purchases by a final demand category from all other industries, including expenditures on imports and inventory withdrawals as well as all expenditures on indirect taxes. These tables are available at the L level. Some data suppression is necessary at the L level due to confidentiality requirements. Explanation on the methodology used is provided to the user by contacting the Industry Accounts Division of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2015-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013086
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In order to study the importance of material offshoring (defined in this paper as the use of intermediate imported materials) at the industry level, it is generally assumed that the import share of each input commodity for a particular industry is similar to that for the economy as a whole-because import data tend to be available only for the latter. This is referred to as the proportionality-based measure of offshoring.

    Recent advances in administrative trade data permit the development of more industry-specific measures of imports. However, these measures generally capture the agent that engages in importation. These firms may only be performing an intermediation role and may be located in industries (e.g., trade or finance) that differ from the industry of use. This study reports on these more direct measures of industry imports using Canadian micro import data as well as hybrid measures that make use of both input and import information. Estimates from various alternatives are then compared to estimates derived from a survey that asked for information on import intensity as part of a more general investigation of innovation.

    Release date: 2013-11-13

  • Table: 15-001-X
    Description:

    This publication contains monthly, quarterly, and annual estimates of gross domestic product for 326 industries, including aggregates and special industry groupings. Estimates are seasonally adjusted, in 1997 dollars, for the year 1997 to the most current period. A brief text, supplemented by charts selected of major industry groupings, provides analytical highlights.

    Release date: 2012-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008019
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it examines the level of multifactor productivity (MFP) in Canada relative to that of the United States for the 1994-to-2003 period. Second, it examines the relative importance of differences in capital intensity and MFP in accounting for the labour productivity differences between the two countries. Third, it traces the overall MFP difference between Canada and the United States to its industry origins and estimates the contributions of the goods, services and engineering sectors to the overall MFP gap.

    Our main findings are as follows. First, the overall capital intensity is as high in Canada as in the United States; but there are considerable differences in Canada's capital intensity across asset classes. Canada has considerably less machinery and equipment, about the same amount of buildings and considerably more engineering construction. Second, most of the differences in labour productivity between Canada and the United States are due to the differences in MFP. Third, our industry results show that the levels of labour productivity and MFP in the goods and the engineering sectors are closer to those of the United States. But, the level of labour and multifactor productivity in the services sector is much lower in Canada. The lower levels of labour productivity and MFP in the Canadian services sector account for most of the overall productivity level difference between the two countries.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20050019457
    Description:

    The administrative data project has helped reduce the response burden of small and medium-sized business. We are continuing this work and expanding our objectives to maximize the use of administrative data. In addition, by exploring the single window reporting method, we plan to decrease the response burden of complex enterprises while ensuring consistent data collection. We will have to overcome some major challenges, some of which may be methodological in nature. Let's see what the future holds!

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 15-207-X
    Description:

    The symmetric industry by industry input-output tables show inter-industry transactions, that is, all purchases of an industry from all other industries as well as expenditures on imports and the components of value added such as wages and gross operating surplus. Similarly, the symmetric final demand tables show all purchases by each final demand category from all industries as well as expenditures on imports. The symmetric input-output tables are analytically derived from the industry by product supply and use tables. The tables are available at the Detail level and at the Link 1997, Link 1961 and Summary aggregations.

    Release date: 2019-01-03

  • Table: 15-208-X
    Description:

    The Industry Accounts Division of Statistics Canada publishes annual supply and use input-output (I-O) tables. While these rectangular, industry by commodity closely reflect actual economic transactions, certain analytical and modeling purposes, however, require symmetric industry-by-industry I-O tables. The symmetric industry by industry table shows the inter-industry transactions, that is, all purchases of an industry from all other industries including expenditures on imports and inventory withdrawals as well as all expenditures on primary inputs. Similarly, the symmetric final demand table shows all purchases by a final demand category from all other industries, including expenditures on imports and inventory withdrawals as well as all expenditures on indirect taxes. These tables are available at the L level. Some data suppression is necessary at the L level due to confidentiality requirements. Explanation on the methodology used is provided to the user by contacting the Industry Accounts Division of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2015-04-08

  • Table: 15-001-X
    Description:

    This publication contains monthly, quarterly, and annual estimates of gross domestic product for 326 industries, including aggregates and special industry groupings. Estimates are seasonally adjusted, in 1997 dollars, for the year 1997 to the most current period. A brief text, supplemented by charts selected of major industry groupings, provides analytical highlights.

    Release date: 2012-12-21
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013086
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In order to study the importance of material offshoring (defined in this paper as the use of intermediate imported materials) at the industry level, it is generally assumed that the import share of each input commodity for a particular industry is similar to that for the economy as a whole-because import data tend to be available only for the latter. This is referred to as the proportionality-based measure of offshoring.

    Recent advances in administrative trade data permit the development of more industry-specific measures of imports. However, these measures generally capture the agent that engages in importation. These firms may only be performing an intermediation role and may be located in industries (e.g., trade or finance) that differ from the industry of use. This study reports on these more direct measures of industry imports using Canadian micro import data as well as hybrid measures that make use of both input and import information. Estimates from various alternatives are then compared to estimates derived from a survey that asked for information on import intensity as part of a more general investigation of innovation.

    Release date: 2013-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008019
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it examines the level of multifactor productivity (MFP) in Canada relative to that of the United States for the 1994-to-2003 period. Second, it examines the relative importance of differences in capital intensity and MFP in accounting for the labour productivity differences between the two countries. Third, it traces the overall MFP difference between Canada and the United States to its industry origins and estimates the contributions of the goods, services and engineering sectors to the overall MFP gap.

    Our main findings are as follows. First, the overall capital intensity is as high in Canada as in the United States; but there are considerable differences in Canada's capital intensity across asset classes. Canada has considerably less machinery and equipment, about the same amount of buildings and considerably more engineering construction. Second, most of the differences in labour productivity between Canada and the United States are due to the differences in MFP. Third, our industry results show that the levels of labour productivity and MFP in the goods and the engineering sectors are closer to those of the United States. But, the level of labour and multifactor productivity in the services sector is much lower in Canada. The lower levels of labour productivity and MFP in the Canadian services sector account for most of the overall productivity level difference between the two countries.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20050019457
    Description:

    The administrative data project has helped reduce the response burden of small and medium-sized business. We are continuing this work and expanding our objectives to maximize the use of administrative data. In addition, by exploring the single window reporting method, we plan to decrease the response burden of complex enterprises while ensuring consistent data collection. We will have to overcome some major challenges, some of which may be methodological in nature. Let's see what the future holds!

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2004070
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to provide up-to-date measures of the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the Canadian food-processing sector.

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-623-X
    Description:

    This product summarizes ongoing research programs in microeconomics and national accounts on such topics as business dynamics, productivity, innovation, competition, investment, small producers, technology, technological change, Canadian-U.S. price differences, international trade, multinationals, eco-efficiency, the environment, and the knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2003-07-10
Reference (12)

Reference (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0026M2005005
    Description:

    The aim of this paper is to describe the actual methodology used to estimate annual hours worked by industry and province in Canada in view to be consistent with the System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2005-08-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020048523
    Description:

    The Provincial Economic Accounts will adopt the Fisher Volume Index, chained annually, as the official measure of real expenditure-based GDP. This change will be incorporated into the affected series back to 1981.

    Release date: 2002-11-07

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020048524
    Description:

    As of November 7, 2002 the Provincial Economic Accounts estimates will incorporate a change related to trade.

    Release date: 2002-11-07

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020038512
    Description:

    As of September 30, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will incorporate the Chain Fisher formula. This change will be applied from January 1997 and will be pushed back to January 1961 within a year.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020028525
    Description:

    A number of changes related to Licenses and Registration, Farm Inventories, Land Transfer Taxes, Spectrum Charges and Trade have been incorporated into the Provincial Economic Accounts. These changes have been incorporated into the affected series back to 1981 and are consistent with those changes which have been incorporated in the National Income and Expenditure Accounts since May 31, 2002.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X200200413022
    Description:

    A number of changes related to Licenses and Registration, Farm Inventories, Land Transfer Taxes, Spectrum Charges and Trade have been incorporated into the Provincial Economic Accounts. These changes have been incorporated into the affected series back to 1981 and are consistent with those changes which have been incorporated in the National Income and Expenditure Accounts since May 31, 2002.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20010018529
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Chain Fisher formula.

    Release date: 2001-05-31
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