Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001176
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the Job Vacancy Survey conducted by Statistics Canada between 1971 and 1978, there is no data which directly measures job vacancies in Canada. Using data from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we attempt to fill this gap. We study the determinants of job vacancies at the location level. We find that workplaces with high vacancy rates consist of at least two types: 1) those employing a highly skilled workforce, innovating, adopting new technologies increasing skill requirements, facing significant international competition and operating in tight local labour markets, and 2) those which are non-unionized, operate in retail trade and consumer services industries and are not part of a multi-location firm. As a result, a substantial share of job vacancies are not in the high-technology sectors. More than 40% of all job vacancies and 50% of long-term vacancies originate from retail trade and consumer services industries.

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the job vacancy rate in Canada in order to estimate companies' hiring intentions and the future direction of labour demand. It uses data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES).

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines a number of significant changes (real or perceived) related to wages and earnings, in the Canadian context, since the recession of the early 1980s.

    Release date: 1998-10-30
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001176
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the Job Vacancy Survey conducted by Statistics Canada between 1971 and 1978, there is no data which directly measures job vacancies in Canada. Using data from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we attempt to fill this gap. We study the determinants of job vacancies at the location level. We find that workplaces with high vacancy rates consist of at least two types: 1) those employing a highly skilled workforce, innovating, adopting new technologies increasing skill requirements, facing significant international competition and operating in tight local labour markets, and 2) those which are non-unionized, operate in retail trade and consumer services industries and are not part of a multi-location firm. As a result, a substantial share of job vacancies are not in the high-technology sectors. More than 40% of all job vacancies and 50% of long-term vacancies originate from retail trade and consumer services industries.

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the job vacancy rate in Canada in order to estimate companies' hiring intentions and the future direction of labour demand. It uses data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES).

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines a number of significant changes (real or perceived) related to wages and earnings, in the Canadian context, since the recession of the early 1980s.

    Release date: 1998-10-30
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: