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  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002055
    Description:

    This paper examines migration into and out of rural and small town (RST) Canada in order to better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population. It also examines the moving population aged 15 and over.

    Release date: 2002-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population is a well recognized phenomenon and has received considerable policy research attention, particularly in the health and public pension domains. Very little work has been focused on the impacts of aging at the organizational level. Foot and Venne studied the advancement of the baby boom through traditional organizational hierarchies, noting its impacts on human resource policies that encourage horizontal career development. Saba et al looked more particularly at the management of older professionals in the Quebec public service, finding that employee recognition was an important human resource strategy for motivating this group. We extend these studies further along the aging ladder -- to the point where retirement and replacement become the major concerns.

    Looking at the management hierarchy within Statistics Canada, we use a microsimulation model first to estimate the expected level of retirements over the next 10 years. We then detail the adjustments to promotion and hiring rates required to replace outgoing managers. We then examine simulated microdata to estimate the experience effects of increasing turnover. Finally, we use the demographic features of the model to examine whether the increasing turnover is likely to increase the representation of women and visible minorities among Statistics Canada managers.

    Given the assumptions outlined in the paper, we find that increasing turnover rates in the next 10 years will generally not reduce management experience to below recently observed levels. We also find that given equal promotion rates for men and women, the representation rate of women among Statistics Canada managers is likely to increase rapidly in coming years. On the other hand, visible minority representation among managers will likely stall for several years, even with proactive recruitment and advancement policies.

    Release date: 2002-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002005
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for interprovincial and intersectoral comparisons.

    The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1992-1993 to 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002003
    Description:

    This is the final of three papers providing data and an overview of the results of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999. Readers are encouraged to use the data. The next edition of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 2001 is expected to be administered in the spring of 2002 with results available early in 2003.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002002
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This report describes an in-depth study of 40 volunteer organizations across Ontario in the fall of 1997 and winter of 1998.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002184
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the Canadian labour market during the 1990s and contrasts it to prior decades, with a special focus on distributional outcomes. It discusses changes in relative earnings between groups, changes in relative labour market outcomes of women and older workers, changes in earnings and income inequality, and changes in low-income.

    Release date: 2002-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Migration is a concern for rural and small town (RST) areas of Canada as rural development is essentially a demographic phenomenon. To date, there has been little analysis of migration patterns and their affect on RST areas. To better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population, this paper documents internal migration into and out of RST Canada. Specifically, the characteristics of the moving population that are 15 years of age and over, with a focus on their levels of human capital, are examined. In addition, characteristics of migrating youth are discussed as youth can be seen as an indicator of the state of rural areas and are a key factor in rural development. The understanding of the patterns of migration may give rise to solutions for the retention of human capital in rural and small town areas and the promotion of rural development.

    Release date: 2002-03-01
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  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002055
    Description:

    This paper examines migration into and out of rural and small town (RST) Canada in order to better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population. It also examines the moving population aged 15 and over.

    Release date: 2002-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population is a well recognized phenomenon and has received considerable policy research attention, particularly in the health and public pension domains. Very little work has been focused on the impacts of aging at the organizational level. Foot and Venne studied the advancement of the baby boom through traditional organizational hierarchies, noting its impacts on human resource policies that encourage horizontal career development. Saba et al looked more particularly at the management of older professionals in the Quebec public service, finding that employee recognition was an important human resource strategy for motivating this group. We extend these studies further along the aging ladder -- to the point where retirement and replacement become the major concerns.

    Looking at the management hierarchy within Statistics Canada, we use a microsimulation model first to estimate the expected level of retirements over the next 10 years. We then detail the adjustments to promotion and hiring rates required to replace outgoing managers. We then examine simulated microdata to estimate the experience effects of increasing turnover. Finally, we use the demographic features of the model to examine whether the increasing turnover is likely to increase the representation of women and visible minorities among Statistics Canada managers.

    Given the assumptions outlined in the paper, we find that increasing turnover rates in the next 10 years will generally not reduce management experience to below recently observed levels. We also find that given equal promotion rates for men and women, the representation rate of women among Statistics Canada managers is likely to increase rapidly in coming years. On the other hand, visible minority representation among managers will likely stall for several years, even with proactive recruitment and advancement policies.

    Release date: 2002-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002005
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for interprovincial and intersectoral comparisons.

    The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1992-1993 to 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002003
    Description:

    This is the final of three papers providing data and an overview of the results of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999. Readers are encouraged to use the data. The next edition of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 2001 is expected to be administered in the spring of 2002 with results available early in 2003.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002002
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This report describes an in-depth study of 40 volunteer organizations across Ontario in the fall of 1997 and winter of 1998.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002184
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the Canadian labour market during the 1990s and contrasts it to prior decades, with a special focus on distributional outcomes. It discusses changes in relative earnings between groups, changes in relative labour market outcomes of women and older workers, changes in earnings and income inequality, and changes in low-income.

    Release date: 2002-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Migration is a concern for rural and small town (RST) areas of Canada as rural development is essentially a demographic phenomenon. To date, there has been little analysis of migration patterns and their affect on RST areas. To better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population, this paper documents internal migration into and out of RST Canada. Specifically, the characteristics of the moving population that are 15 years of age and over, with a focus on their levels of human capital, are examined. In addition, characteristics of migrating youth are discussed as youth can be seen as an indicator of the state of rural areas and are a key factor in rural development. The understanding of the patterns of migration may give rise to solutions for the retention of human capital in rural and small town areas and the promotion of rural development.

    Release date: 2002-03-01
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