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All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710713191
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1990s, the high-tech sector expanded at a much greater rate than the rest of the economy, its employment eventually representing 4.5% of the workforce in 2000. Then came the meltdown in 2001 with its headlines of large-scale layoffs. Many were unable to find other jobs in the sector, and some moved to other cities. The article looks at the statistics behind the headlines, in particular the permanent layoff rates and earnings of high-tech workers compared with those in other industries.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Does innovation thrive best in industry clusters? That is, is a company more likely to be innovative if it is located close to many of its rivals? And what role does research at a local university play on industrial innovation? A recent study based on data from a Statistics Canada innovation survey, finds that firms located near their rivals or universities are no more innovative than other firms in the same industry are, except at extremely short distances.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004013
    Description:

    This paper presents an index of specialization (the location quotient) for Canada's 50 largest communities. It also presents the initial analysis comparing changes in specialization in selected high-technology industries with changes in employment in these communities.

    Release date: 2004-07-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores the information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries of Canada's knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2004-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08
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Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710713191
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1990s, the high-tech sector expanded at a much greater rate than the rest of the economy, its employment eventually representing 4.5% of the workforce in 2000. Then came the meltdown in 2001 with its headlines of large-scale layoffs. Many were unable to find other jobs in the sector, and some moved to other cities. The article looks at the statistics behind the headlines, in particular the permanent layoff rates and earnings of high-tech workers compared with those in other industries.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Does innovation thrive best in industry clusters? That is, is a company more likely to be innovative if it is located close to many of its rivals? And what role does research at a local university play on industrial innovation? A recent study based on data from a Statistics Canada innovation survey, finds that firms located near their rivals or universities are no more innovative than other firms in the same industry are, except at extremely short distances.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004013
    Description:

    This paper presents an index of specialization (the location quotient) for Canada's 50 largest communities. It also presents the initial analysis comparing changes in specialization in selected high-technology industries with changes in employment in these communities.

    Release date: 2004-07-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores the information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries of Canada's knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2004-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08
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