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  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710713191
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1990s, the high-tech sector expanded at a much greater rate than the rest of the economy, its employment eventually representing 4.5% of the workforce in 2000. Then came the meltdown in 2001 with its headlines of large-scale layoffs. Many were unable to find other jobs in the sector, and some moved to other cities. The article looks at the statistics behind the headlines, in particular the permanent layoff rates and earnings of high-tech workers compared with those in other industries.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961-2004. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 96F0030X2001012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides information on the changes that took place in the education profile of the Canadian population through the last decade. Results from the 2001 Census show that the Canadian population is better educated than ever before. Declines in the number of people with less than a high school education have been offset by considerable growth in the number of college and university graduates. The report includes an analysis of subject areas that were studied for the population with trade school, college, or university credentials. Census results also indicate that the Canadian population continues to make a strong commitment to learning.

    These data are used by governments, schools, teachers' organizations and other entities to create policy and establish practices related to the education system in Canada. Information on the education profile of particular segments of the Canadian population, such as specific age groups, males and females, recent immigrants to Canada, and members of the Aboriginal identity population, is available through census data. The report also highlights the education profile of each province and territory, and of a number of smaller geographic areas.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 81-229-X
    Description:

    This publication is an annual review of statistics on Canadian education. It summarizes information on institutions, enrolment, graduates, teachers and finance for all levels of education and provides an analysis of the data. Ten-year time series are shown for most variables at the Canada level and five-year time series at the provincial level. The publication also provides demographic data from the census of Canada and educational attainment, labour force participation rates and unemployment rates of the adult population from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (69)

Analysis (69) (0 to 10 of 69 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710713191
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1990s, the high-tech sector expanded at a much greater rate than the rest of the economy, its employment eventually representing 4.5% of the workforce in 2000. Then came the meltdown in 2001 with its headlines of large-scale layoffs. Many were unable to find other jobs in the sector, and some moved to other cities. The article looks at the statistics behind the headlines, in particular the permanent layoff rates and earnings of high-tech workers compared with those in other industries.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961-2004. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0077G
    Description:

    This publication provides a description of the data sources and methods used to compile the input-output tables at constant prices. It includes a brief description of the accounting framework, an overview of the methods used for the major components of the tables and an outline of the techniques applied to each group of goods and services. It also distinguishes between the derivation of the gross domestic product by industry for the business sector and that of the non-business sector. Finally, it discusses some of the critical contemporary issues that are being addressed at the time of writing.

    Release date: 2001-02-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970023614
    Description:

    In 1993, Statistics Canada implemented Computer-assisted Interviewing (CAI) for conducting interviews for some household surveys that were conducted in a decentralised environment. The technology has been successfully used for a number of years, and most household surveys have now been converted to this collection mode. This paper is a summary of the experience and the lessons that have been learned since the research started. It described some of the tests that led to the implementation of the technology, and some of the new opportunities that have arisen with its implementation. It also discusses some challenges that were faced when CAI was implemented (some are on-going issues), and ends with a brief overview of where this may lead us in the future.

    Release date: 1998-03-12
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