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All (4) ((4 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • 2. Canadians abroad Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110517
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada is also a player on the world stage as a source country of migrants. Whether Canadian migration abroad is temporary or permanent, long term or short term, far or near, Canadians are making their mark in other countries. This article, although not a complete accounting of Canadians living abroad, shows that Canadian out-migration is just as selective as in-migration.

    Release date: 2008-03-13

  • Table: 97-557-X2006019
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Immigration and citizenship', which presents data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population: its size, its geographic distribution, its origins and its demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship, and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Immigration and citizenship, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-557-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-557-XWE2006019.

    Release date: 2007-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the inter-provincial labour mobility behaviour of immigrants relative to that of native-born Canadians. Foreign-born Canadians differ a great deal from their domestically-born counterparts. The foreign-born population is geographically concentrated in a few provinces and a few big cities. As a whole, they are older, better educated, more likely to be married, and more likely to have dependent children and bigger households. They are less active in participating in full-time education and training. They fare relatively better in the labour market. As a result, a higher proportion of them receive social security benefits that are directly tied to the presence of dependent children or age such as family allowance benefits and pension income, but a lower proportion receive benefits that are related to labour market performance such as employment insurance benefits and social assistance benefits.

    As a whole, immigrants are relatively less mobile inter-provincially. This is true both nationally and across almost every province. Among those who move to other provinces, destinations for foreign-born migrants are highly geographically concentrated. Most of them make their new homes in Alberta, Ontario and British Columbia. A significantly lower proportion of them relocate to other provinces for economic considerations but a much higher proportion move to go to school or after retirement. Earnings return to their inter-provincial migration is significantly more substantial. This is the result of both wage increase and more hours of work after migration.

    Multi-variate regression results show that there are no statistically significant structural differences in the determinants of inter-provincial migration decisions between comparable foreign- and native-born Canadians. The probability of moving to other provinces, for immigrants as well as for domestically-born Canadians, is higher if earnings potentials elsewhere are relatively higher, lower if it is relatively harder to find employment elsewhere, higher among better educated workers, lower among French-speaking Canadians, lower among union members, and decreases with age, family size and job tenure. None of the proxies for government's labour market interventions significantly affect the decision to move inter-provincially. The lower mobility rates among the foreign-born are fully attributable to distributional and compositional differences between the immigrant and non-immigrant populations.

    These findings have a direct policy implication on immigration selection. To encourage population and labour force growth in economically less prosperous provinces, it appears appropriate and effective to amend the current immigration selection and approval system, considering intended destinations as an additional factor and awarding additional points to applicants who choose designated provinces.

    Release date: 1998-09-23
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 97-557-X2006019
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Immigration and citizenship', which presents data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population: its size, its geographic distribution, its origins and its demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship, and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Immigration and citizenship, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-557-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-557-XWE2006019.

    Release date: 2007-12-04
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • 2. Canadians abroad Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110517
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada is also a player on the world stage as a source country of migrants. Whether Canadian migration abroad is temporary or permanent, long term or short term, far or near, Canadians are making their mark in other countries. This article, although not a complete accounting of Canadians living abroad, shows that Canadian out-migration is just as selective as in-migration.

    Release date: 2008-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the inter-provincial labour mobility behaviour of immigrants relative to that of native-born Canadians. Foreign-born Canadians differ a great deal from their domestically-born counterparts. The foreign-born population is geographically concentrated in a few provinces and a few big cities. As a whole, they are older, better educated, more likely to be married, and more likely to have dependent children and bigger households. They are less active in participating in full-time education and training. They fare relatively better in the labour market. As a result, a higher proportion of them receive social security benefits that are directly tied to the presence of dependent children or age such as family allowance benefits and pension income, but a lower proportion receive benefits that are related to labour market performance such as employment insurance benefits and social assistance benefits.

    As a whole, immigrants are relatively less mobile inter-provincially. This is true both nationally and across almost every province. Among those who move to other provinces, destinations for foreign-born migrants are highly geographically concentrated. Most of them make their new homes in Alberta, Ontario and British Columbia. A significantly lower proportion of them relocate to other provinces for economic considerations but a much higher proportion move to go to school or after retirement. Earnings return to their inter-provincial migration is significantly more substantial. This is the result of both wage increase and more hours of work after migration.

    Multi-variate regression results show that there are no statistically significant structural differences in the determinants of inter-provincial migration decisions between comparable foreign- and native-born Canadians. The probability of moving to other provinces, for immigrants as well as for domestically-born Canadians, is higher if earnings potentials elsewhere are relatively higher, lower if it is relatively harder to find employment elsewhere, higher among better educated workers, lower among French-speaking Canadians, lower among union members, and decreases with age, family size and job tenure. None of the proxies for government's labour market interventions significantly affect the decision to move inter-provincially. The lower mobility rates among the foreign-born are fully attributable to distributional and compositional differences between the immigrant and non-immigrant populations.

    These findings have a direct policy implication on immigration selection. To encourage population and labour force growth in economically less prosperous provinces, it appears appropriate and effective to amend the current immigration selection and approval system, considering intended destinations as an additional factor and awarding additional points to applicants who choose designated provinces.

    Release date: 1998-09-23
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