Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

9 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (14)

All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500814225
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits/consequences are for Canada.

    Outward Foreign Affiliate Statistics (FAS), which describe the activities as well as financial positions of Canadian majority-owned foreign affiliates (MOFAS), can shed light on some of these issues by going beyond the traditional realm of cross-border foreign investment statistics to articulate the activities and financial positions of Canadian enterprises that operate abroad. As an extension of statistics on foreign direct investment they can be seen as providing additional insight of the effect on economic agents in national economies in terms of earnings, productivity, employment, trade and foreign exposures resulting from an increasingly inter-connected and integrated global economy.

    This paper presents some data development work on the expansion of the outward FAS program at Statistics Canada, the considerations and strategy for improvement, and provides a first look at the expanded details in the form of provisional estimates for reference year 2012.

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500714220
    Description:

    Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - both Canadian Direct Investment Abroad (CDIA) and Foreign Direct Investment in Canada (FDIC) - is a useful indicator of Canada’s level of economic globalization, allowing some insight on how interrelated our economic infrastructure is with jurisdictions in the rest of the world. These data provide information on the first level of connectivity of international inter-corporate relationships, which are closely related to trade and fragmented global production-distribution.

    Foreign Affiliate Statistics are an extension of statistics on Foreign Direction Investment. They provide additional insight of the effect on economic agents in national economies in terms of earnings, productivity, employment, trade and foreign exposures resulting from an increasingly inter-connected and integrated global economy. Inward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FAS) describe the activities as well as financial positions of Majority-Owned Domestic Affiliates (MODAs), a subset of Canadian direct investment enterprises and their consolidated subsidiaries operating in the Canadian economy. FAS are derived from international FDI concepts and frameworks. Statistics Canada’s Inward Foreign Affiliate and Trade Statistics program is closely related to expanded estimates of outward FAS, described in a separate paper. Both inward and outward FAS are part of, and this work lays the groundwork for, the development and release of a broader set of data on the Activities of Multi-National Enterprises (AMNE). This paper presents some data development work on inward foreign affiliate statistics that is a step towards shedding light on some of these issues.

    This paper found that MODAs account for a significant share of assets, operating revenues and employment in the Canadian economy. Furthermore, MODAs assumed even higher shares of exports and imports of goods and services.

    Release date: 2015-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights the new set of estimates for Canadian direct investment abroad and Foreign direct investment in Canada that present Canada's international investment position on a market value basis. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy. Several of these articles highlight changes to the organization of the national accounts data or draw attention to improvements in measurement.

    Release date: 2012-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008020
    Description:

    This paper compares the productivity growth of a set of Canadian and U.S. regulated industries. Using data from Statistics Canada's KLEMS database and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the paper examines productivity growth in transportation services (which includes air and rail), broadcasting and telecommunications, and financial services (which includes financial intermediation and insurance), over the period from 1977 to 2003. The majority of these provide the foundational networks on which other industries rely. These sectors were quite heavily regulated in Canada at the beginning of the period of study (1977), experienced partial deregulation during the period and still faced various types of regulation at the end (2003). Deregulation also occurred in the United States, but regulation has generally been less restrictive there over most of the period.

    The evidence shows that many of the Canadian industries that underwent deregulation experienced faster labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity growth than did the aggregate Canadian business sector and had similar or higher productivity growth than did their counterparts in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period. Those industries include rail transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, financial intermediation and insurance carriers. The airline industry had slower productivity growth in Canada than in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060029209
    Description:

    The market value of foreign direct investment position is presented for the first time along with an explanation of the methodology developed to produce these first estimates.

    Release date: 2006-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060039136
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Foreign control in our economy has fallen and rebounded largely as a result of regulatory changes, especially in energy.

    Release date: 2006-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines broad changes in foreign ownership in Canada over the last forty years. It makes use of several different but complementary data sources that are produced by Statistics Canada to analyze the importance of foreign ownership in Canada. Over the last four decades, foreign multinationals that are operating in Canada have experienced first, a retrenchment and then, a resurgence in their activities. This retrenchment occurred during the period when foreign investment was tightly regulated and could be found across most industries, but was particularly evident in the energy and mining sector. The resurgence that has occurred subsequent to the introduction of a more liberal regulatory regime was also relatively widespread, though there are several sectors like the science-based and energy industries where this has not occurred.

    Release date: 2005-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyses Canadian direct investment abroad in 'Offshore Financial Centers' between 1990 and 2003. It provides an analysis of the distribution of Canadian direct investment assets in these countries and elsewhere in the world by industry. Lastly, it measures and analyses these countries' contribution to the growth of assets held abroad by Canadian companies during the period.

    Release date: 2005-03-14
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500814225
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits/consequences are for Canada.

    Outward Foreign Affiliate Statistics (FAS), which describe the activities as well as financial positions of Canadian majority-owned foreign affiliates (MOFAS), can shed light on some of these issues by going beyond the traditional realm of cross-border foreign investment statistics to articulate the activities and financial positions of Canadian enterprises that operate abroad. As an extension of statistics on foreign direct investment they can be seen as providing additional insight of the effect on economic agents in national economies in terms of earnings, productivity, employment, trade and foreign exposures resulting from an increasingly inter-connected and integrated global economy.

    This paper presents some data development work on the expansion of the outward FAS program at Statistics Canada, the considerations and strategy for improvement, and provides a first look at the expanded details in the form of provisional estimates for reference year 2012.

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500714220
    Description:

    Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) - both Canadian Direct Investment Abroad (CDIA) and Foreign Direct Investment in Canada (FDIC) - is a useful indicator of Canada’s level of economic globalization, allowing some insight on how interrelated our economic infrastructure is with jurisdictions in the rest of the world. These data provide information on the first level of connectivity of international inter-corporate relationships, which are closely related to trade and fragmented global production-distribution.

    Foreign Affiliate Statistics are an extension of statistics on Foreign Direction Investment. They provide additional insight of the effect on economic agents in national economies in terms of earnings, productivity, employment, trade and foreign exposures resulting from an increasingly inter-connected and integrated global economy. Inward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FAS) describe the activities as well as financial positions of Majority-Owned Domestic Affiliates (MODAs), a subset of Canadian direct investment enterprises and their consolidated subsidiaries operating in the Canadian economy. FAS are derived from international FDI concepts and frameworks. Statistics Canada’s Inward Foreign Affiliate and Trade Statistics program is closely related to expanded estimates of outward FAS, described in a separate paper. Both inward and outward FAS are part of, and this work lays the groundwork for, the development and release of a broader set of data on the Activities of Multi-National Enterprises (AMNE). This paper presents some data development work on inward foreign affiliate statistics that is a step towards shedding light on some of these issues.

    This paper found that MODAs account for a significant share of assets, operating revenues and employment in the Canadian economy. Furthermore, MODAs assumed even higher shares of exports and imports of goods and services.

    Release date: 2015-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights the new set of estimates for Canadian direct investment abroad and Foreign direct investment in Canada that present Canada's international investment position on a market value basis. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy. Several of these articles highlight changes to the organization of the national accounts data or draw attention to improvements in measurement.

    Release date: 2012-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008020
    Description:

    This paper compares the productivity growth of a set of Canadian and U.S. regulated industries. Using data from Statistics Canada's KLEMS database and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the paper examines productivity growth in transportation services (which includes air and rail), broadcasting and telecommunications, and financial services (which includes financial intermediation and insurance), over the period from 1977 to 2003. The majority of these provide the foundational networks on which other industries rely. These sectors were quite heavily regulated in Canada at the beginning of the period of study (1977), experienced partial deregulation during the period and still faced various types of regulation at the end (2003). Deregulation also occurred in the United States, but regulation has generally been less restrictive there over most of the period.

    The evidence shows that many of the Canadian industries that underwent deregulation experienced faster labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity growth than did the aggregate Canadian business sector and had similar or higher productivity growth than did their counterparts in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period. Those industries include rail transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, financial intermediation and insurance carriers. The airline industry had slower productivity growth in Canada than in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060029209
    Description:

    The market value of foreign direct investment position is presented for the first time along with an explanation of the methodology developed to produce these first estimates.

    Release date: 2006-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060039136
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Foreign control in our economy has fallen and rebounded largely as a result of regulatory changes, especially in energy.

    Release date: 2006-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines broad changes in foreign ownership in Canada over the last forty years. It makes use of several different but complementary data sources that are produced by Statistics Canada to analyze the importance of foreign ownership in Canada. Over the last four decades, foreign multinationals that are operating in Canada have experienced first, a retrenchment and then, a resurgence in their activities. This retrenchment occurred during the period when foreign investment was tightly regulated and could be found across most industries, but was particularly evident in the energy and mining sector. The resurgence that has occurred subsequent to the introduction of a more liberal regulatory regime was also relatively widespread, though there are several sectors like the science-based and energy industries where this has not occurred.

    Release date: 2005-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyses Canadian direct investment abroad in 'Offshore Financial Centers' between 1990 and 2003. It provides an analysis of the distribution of Canadian direct investment assets in these countries and elsewhere in the world by industry. Lastly, it measures and analyses these countries' contribution to the growth of assets held abroad by Canadian companies during the period.

    Release date: 2005-03-14
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: