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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-210-G
    Description:

    The Guide to Job Vacancy Statistics provides an overview of the structure of the survey and covers topics such as survey methodology, data quality as well as terms and definitions.

    Release date: 2016-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913256
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines long-term trends in employment for postsecondary students. The rate of employment, hours of work and employment earnings of male and female students are covered. How other student characteristics relate to employment is also addressed. Particular attention is paid to student employment during labour market downturns.

    Release date: 2010-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment in manufacturing in Canada has fluctuated over recent decades. The level reached a historically high in 2004 and has been declining since that time.

    In 2008, over one-half (54%) of all Canadian manufacturing workers were employed in the value chain of a resource sector.

    In 2008, resource sector manufacturing employment was relatively more important in rural and small town areas (69% of manufacturing employment and 9% of total employment) compared to larger urban centres (50% of manufacturing employment and 6% of total employment).

    In the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment became a larger share of total manufacturing employment (up from 51% to 54%) because resource manufacturing employment declined less (-6%) compared to the decline of all 'other' manufacturing employment (-18%).

    Also, in the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment become relatively more important in rural and small town areas as the decline (-3%) was smaller in rural and small town areas compared to the decline in larger urban centres (-7%).

    Within rural and small town areas at the Canada level, 9% of total employment in 2008 was resource sector manufacturing employment. This ranged from 14% within the rural and small town areas of Quebec to 2% within the rural and small town areas of Saskatchewan.

    Within rural and small town areas in 2008, employment in wood processing accounted for the largest share of resource sector manufacturing employment (43%).

    Release date: 2010-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213223
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Manufacturing employment has been declining in most OECD countries. From 2004 to 2008, more than one in seven manufacturing jobs were lost in Canada, with almost all manufacturing industries sharing in the downturn. The majority of job losses were in Ontario, but other parts of the country were also affected. Canada's large metropolitan areas were the hardest hit.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213224
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Following six years of strong employment growth, 2008 started well as Canada's employment rate hit a new high and the unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low. In the last quarter of the year, however, job losses in cyclically sensitive industries such as manufacturing, natural resources and construction led to a drop in overall employment.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100114526
    Description:

    A chronic problem in the preparation of time critical estimates is the significant limitations inherent in data collection by mail. To address this issue, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted an extensive 7 year research effort into the use of computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) and the computer assisted self interviewing (CASI) methods of touchtone and voice recognition self-response. This paper will summarize some of the significant results of this research covering both performance and cost data. The paper will conclude with a discussion of a large scale implementation program of these techniques for a monthly sample of 350,000 establishments.

    Release date: 1991-06-14
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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913256
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines long-term trends in employment for postsecondary students. The rate of employment, hours of work and employment earnings of male and female students are covered. How other student characteristics relate to employment is also addressed. Particular attention is paid to student employment during labour market downturns.

    Release date: 2010-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment in manufacturing in Canada has fluctuated over recent decades. The level reached a historically high in 2004 and has been declining since that time.

    In 2008, over one-half (54%) of all Canadian manufacturing workers were employed in the value chain of a resource sector.

    In 2008, resource sector manufacturing employment was relatively more important in rural and small town areas (69% of manufacturing employment and 9% of total employment) compared to larger urban centres (50% of manufacturing employment and 6% of total employment).

    In the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment became a larger share of total manufacturing employment (up from 51% to 54%) because resource manufacturing employment declined less (-6%) compared to the decline of all 'other' manufacturing employment (-18%).

    Also, in the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment become relatively more important in rural and small town areas as the decline (-3%) was smaller in rural and small town areas compared to the decline in larger urban centres (-7%).

    Within rural and small town areas at the Canada level, 9% of total employment in 2008 was resource sector manufacturing employment. This ranged from 14% within the rural and small town areas of Quebec to 2% within the rural and small town areas of Saskatchewan.

    Within rural and small town areas in 2008, employment in wood processing accounted for the largest share of resource sector manufacturing employment (43%).

    Release date: 2010-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213223
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Manufacturing employment has been declining in most OECD countries. From 2004 to 2008, more than one in seven manufacturing jobs were lost in Canada, with almost all manufacturing industries sharing in the downturn. The majority of job losses were in Ontario, but other parts of the country were also affected. Canada's large metropolitan areas were the hardest hit.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213224
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Following six years of strong employment growth, 2008 started well as Canada's employment rate hit a new high and the unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low. In the last quarter of the year, however, job losses in cyclically sensitive industries such as manufacturing, natural resources and construction led to a drop in overall employment.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100114526
    Description:

    A chronic problem in the preparation of time critical estimates is the significant limitations inherent in data collection by mail. To address this issue, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted an extensive 7 year research effort into the use of computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) and the computer assisted self interviewing (CASI) methods of touchtone and voice recognition self-response. This paper will summarize some of the significant results of this research covering both performance and cost data. The paper will conclude with a discussion of a large scale implementation program of these techniques for a monthly sample of 350,000 establishments.

    Release date: 1991-06-14
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-210-G
    Description:

    The Guide to Job Vacancy Statistics provides an overview of the structure of the survey and covers topics such as survey methodology, data quality as well as terms and definitions.

    Release date: 2016-03-31
Date modified: