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All (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200001
    Description: The COVID-19 lockdowns early in the pandemic had significant impacts on employment in both Canada and the United States. Post-COVID-19, the labour markets have behaved quite differently in their recovery phases. While there have been some similarities, especially by industry, there have been some stark differences as well. This paper examines the differences between the two labour markets post-lockdown by comparing the employment recovery of the various industries, the labour force participation rates, and labour churn.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2015031
    Description:

    Canada has a large group of unincorporated self-employed businesses that play a critical role in the early lifecycle of firms. This study presents summary statistics on the importance of a particular group of the self-employed: those whose primary source of income from employment comes from an unincorporated business.

    The unincorporated self-employed measured in this study are those who file the Canada Revenue Agency’s income tax return (the T1 form) and report self-employed income as the primary source of their income. The study spans the period from 1989 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012025
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether Canadian firms of different sizes (in terms of employment) grow at different rates year-on-year. The data are from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program and cover the 1999-to-2008 period. The methodology is similar to that used by Haltiwanger, Jarmin and Miranda (2010) for the United States: controls are used for firm age, and possible bias from short-term regression to the mean is removed by sizing firms according to their average number of employees in both previous and current years.

    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm turnover and productivity growth in the Canadian retail trade sector. Firm turnover occurs as the competitive process shifts market share from exiting firms and existing firms that contracted to entering firms and existing firms that expanded. There is considerably more firm turnover in the retail sector than in the manufacturing sector and more of it comes from entry and exit. Moreover, contrary to the manufacturing sector where only part of overall productivity growth comes from firm turnover and the re-allocation of resources from the less to the more productive, all of the aggregate productivity growth comes from this source in the retail sector. This suggests that the much-discussed Wal-Mart effect on retail sector productivity mainly comes from the Wal-Mart-created competitive pressure that shifts market share from exitors and declining incumbents to entrants and growing incumbents. Foreign-controlled firms contributed 30% of labour productivity growth and 45% of multifactor productivity growth in the retail trade sector in the period from 1984 to 1996, which are mainly due to the entry of foreign-controlled firms and expansion of more productive foreign-controlled existing firms.

    Release date: 2008-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in age and sex data from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11
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Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200001
    Description: The COVID-19 lockdowns early in the pandemic had significant impacts on employment in both Canada and the United States. Post-COVID-19, the labour markets have behaved quite differently in their recovery phases. While there have been some similarities, especially by industry, there have been some stark differences as well. This paper examines the differences between the two labour markets post-lockdown by comparing the employment recovery of the various industries, the labour force participation rates, and labour churn.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2015031
    Description:

    Canada has a large group of unincorporated self-employed businesses that play a critical role in the early lifecycle of firms. This study presents summary statistics on the importance of a particular group of the self-employed: those whose primary source of income from employment comes from an unincorporated business.

    The unincorporated self-employed measured in this study are those who file the Canada Revenue Agency’s income tax return (the T1 form) and report self-employed income as the primary source of their income. The study spans the period from 1989 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012025
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether Canadian firms of different sizes (in terms of employment) grow at different rates year-on-year. The data are from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program and cover the 1999-to-2008 period. The methodology is similar to that used by Haltiwanger, Jarmin and Miranda (2010) for the United States: controls are used for firm age, and possible bias from short-term regression to the mean is removed by sizing firms according to their average number of employees in both previous and current years.

    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm turnover and productivity growth in the Canadian retail trade sector. Firm turnover occurs as the competitive process shifts market share from exiting firms and existing firms that contracted to entering firms and existing firms that expanded. There is considerably more firm turnover in the retail sector than in the manufacturing sector and more of it comes from entry and exit. Moreover, contrary to the manufacturing sector where only part of overall productivity growth comes from firm turnover and the re-allocation of resources from the less to the more productive, all of the aggregate productivity growth comes from this source in the retail sector. This suggests that the much-discussed Wal-Mart effect on retail sector productivity mainly comes from the Wal-Mart-created competitive pressure that shifts market share from exitors and declining incumbents to entrants and growing incumbents. Foreign-controlled firms contributed 30% of labour productivity growth and 45% of multifactor productivity growth in the retail trade sector in the period from 1984 to 1996, which are mainly due to the entry of foreign-controlled firms and expansion of more productive foreign-controlled existing firms.

    Release date: 2008-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in age and sex data from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11
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