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    All (8)

    All (8) ((8 results))

    • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

      Release date: 2012-11-23

    • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010987
      Description:

      Over the last few years, there have been large progress in the web data collection area. Today, many statistical offices offer a web alternative in many different types of surveys. It is widely believed that web data collection may raise data quality while lowering data collection costs. Experience has shown that, offered web as a second alternative to paper questionnaires; enterprises have been slow to embrace the web alternative. On the other hand, experiments have also shown that by promoting web over paper, it is possible to raise the web take up rates. However, there are still few studies on what happens when the contact strategy is changed radically and the web option is the only option given in a complex enterprise survey. In 2008, Statistics Sweden took the step of using more or less a web-only strategy in the survey of industrial production (PRODCOM). The web questionnaire was developed in the generalised tool for web surveys used by Statistics Sweden. The paper presents the web solution and some experiences from the 2008 PRODCOM survey, including process data on response rates and error ratios as well as the results of a cognitive follow-up of the survey. Some important lessons learned are also presented.

      Release date: 2009-12-03

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

      Release date: 2007-11-05

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

      Release date: 2007-05-10

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039533
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Over the past decade, Internet content has evolved to the point where it now represents a significant source of information and entertainment for many people. The Internet has changed the way that many individuals and organizations gather information, and has undoubtedly had some influence on their use of traditional media. While few Canadians had Internet access and went online to gather news information in the mid-1990's, today many use the Internet to access online newspapers, reports, discussion forums and even blogs. In 2005 for example, about 62% of home Internet users - or 38% of Canadian adults overall - went online to view news or sports information (Statistics Canada 2006).

      Release date: 2006-12-06

    • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003002
      Description:

      Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

      The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

      Release date: 2003-03-03

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015851
      Description:

      We consider 'telesurveys' as surveys in which the predominant or unique mode of collection is based on some means of electronic telecommunications - including both the telephone and other more advanced technological devices such as e-mail, Internet, videophone or fax. We review, briefly, the early history of telephone surveys, and, in more detail, recent developments in the areas of sample design and estimation, coverage and nonresponse and evaluation of data quality. All these methodological developments have led the telephone survey to become the major mode of collection in the sample survey field in the past quarter of a century. Other modes of advanced telecommunication are fast becoming important supplements and even competitors to the fixed line telephone and are already being used in various ways for sample surveys. We examine their potential for survey work and the possible impact of current and future technological developments of the communications industry on survey practice and their methodological implications.

      Release date: 2001-08-22

    • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1999006
      Description:

      This study provides background information towards developing working definitions of e-commerce. In addition, through selected case studies it examines whether respondents could provide information for such measurements. The study distinguishes between e-commerce and e-business, the former being a sub-set of the latter and emphasizes computer-mediation as an important feature of this phenomenon. A definition of e-commerce is then proposed: "Transactions carried over computer-mediated channels that comprise the transfer of ownership or the entitlement to use tangible or intangible assets".

      Release date: 1999-08-20
    Data (1)

    Data (1) ((1 result))

    • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

      Release date: 2012-11-23
    Analysis (7)

    Analysis (7) ((7 results))

    • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010987
      Description:

      Over the last few years, there have been large progress in the web data collection area. Today, many statistical offices offer a web alternative in many different types of surveys. It is widely believed that web data collection may raise data quality while lowering data collection costs. Experience has shown that, offered web as a second alternative to paper questionnaires; enterprises have been slow to embrace the web alternative. On the other hand, experiments have also shown that by promoting web over paper, it is possible to raise the web take up rates. However, there are still few studies on what happens when the contact strategy is changed radically and the web option is the only option given in a complex enterprise survey. In 2008, Statistics Sweden took the step of using more or less a web-only strategy in the survey of industrial production (PRODCOM). The web questionnaire was developed in the generalised tool for web surveys used by Statistics Sweden. The paper presents the web solution and some experiences from the 2008 PRODCOM survey, including process data on response rates and error ratios as well as the results of a cognitive follow-up of the survey. Some important lessons learned are also presented.

      Release date: 2009-12-03

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

      Release date: 2007-11-05

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

      Release date: 2007-05-10

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039533
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Over the past decade, Internet content has evolved to the point where it now represents a significant source of information and entertainment for many people. The Internet has changed the way that many individuals and organizations gather information, and has undoubtedly had some influence on their use of traditional media. While few Canadians had Internet access and went online to gather news information in the mid-1990's, today many use the Internet to access online newspapers, reports, discussion forums and even blogs. In 2005 for example, about 62% of home Internet users - or 38% of Canadian adults overall - went online to view news or sports information (Statistics Canada 2006).

      Release date: 2006-12-06

    • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003002
      Description:

      Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

      The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

      Release date: 2003-03-03

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015851
      Description:

      We consider 'telesurveys' as surveys in which the predominant or unique mode of collection is based on some means of electronic telecommunications - including both the telephone and other more advanced technological devices such as e-mail, Internet, videophone or fax. We review, briefly, the early history of telephone surveys, and, in more detail, recent developments in the areas of sample design and estimation, coverage and nonresponse and evaluation of data quality. All these methodological developments have led the telephone survey to become the major mode of collection in the sample survey field in the past quarter of a century. Other modes of advanced telecommunication are fast becoming important supplements and even competitors to the fixed line telephone and are already being used in various ways for sample surveys. We examine their potential for survey work and the possible impact of current and future technological developments of the communications industry on survey practice and their methodological implications.

      Release date: 2001-08-22

    • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1999006
      Description:

      This study provides background information towards developing working definitions of e-commerce. In addition, through selected case studies it examines whether respondents could provide information for such measurements. The study distinguishes between e-commerce and e-business, the former being a sub-set of the latter and emphasizes computer-mediation as an important feature of this phenomenon. A definition of e-commerce is then proposed: "Transactions carried over computer-mediated channels that comprise the transfer of ownership or the entitlement to use tangible or intangible assets".

      Release date: 1999-08-20
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