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All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011113260
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article tracks trends in temporary employment since the Labour Force Survey (LFS) began measuring it from 1997 to 2009 with particular attention to the recent economic downturn. It also examines the earnings gap between temporary and permanent positions and looks at whether that gap changed during the recent employment slowdown.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001111370
    Description:

    A look at how these different measures relate to each other, when they should be used and why statistical agencies have developed more sophisticated measures of volume data.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18
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Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011113260
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article tracks trends in temporary employment since the Labour Force Survey (LFS) began measuring it from 1997 to 2009 with particular attention to the recent economic downturn. It also examines the earnings gap between temporary and permanent positions and looks at whether that gap changed during the recent employment slowdown.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001111370
    Description:

    A look at how these different measures relate to each other, when they should be used and why statistical agencies have developed more sophisticated measures of volume data.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05
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