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  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999021
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth, and are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. Changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can also affect consumer preferences, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of various goods and services.

    Based on Family Expenditure Survey data for both 1986 and 1996, this study examines how the household consumption of services has shifted over the past decade. Particular attention is paid to spending on: communications services; finance and real estate services; food and beverage services; traveler accommodation services; amusement and recreation services; and personal and household services. Insights are also provided on why household spending patterns for specific service commodities have changed from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-01-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18
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  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999021
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth, and are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. Changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can also affect consumer preferences, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of various goods and services.

    Based on Family Expenditure Survey data for both 1986 and 1996, this study examines how the household consumption of services has shifted over the past decade. Particular attention is paid to spending on: communications services; finance and real estate services; food and beverage services; traveler accommodation services; amusement and recreation services; and personal and household services. Insights are also provided on why household spending patterns for specific service commodities have changed from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-01-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18
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