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  • Table: 61-220-X
    Description:

    Each year, Statistics Canada produces a report on foreign control {Foreign control in the Canadian economy}, as stipulated in the Corporations Returns Act. This report draws a national profile of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy, examining financial and ownership information on corporations conducting business in Canada. This information is used to evaluate the extent and effect of non-resident control of the Canadian corporate economy. The report includes charts and tables providing time series on selected financial characteristics (assets, operating revenue and operating profits) by specific country of control and classified by major industry groups. The statistics provided in the Corporations Returns Act report are presented at the 21-industry level, using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). Previous versions of this report may use different industry classification systems. The industry system used will be referenced within the specific version.

    Release date: 2019-09-11

  • Table: 63-238-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the real estate agents, brokers, appraisers and other real estate industries. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-02-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent of the culture workforce in cities and rural areas across Canada.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005015
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected industries serving the mining and/or forestry sectors, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005013
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected professional, scientific and technical service industries, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 61-220-X
    Description:

    Each year, Statistics Canada produces a report on foreign control {Foreign control in the Canadian economy}, as stipulated in the Corporations Returns Act. This report draws a national profile of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy, examining financial and ownership information on corporations conducting business in Canada. This information is used to evaluate the extent and effect of non-resident control of the Canadian corporate economy. The report includes charts and tables providing time series on selected financial characteristics (assets, operating revenue and operating profits) by specific country of control and classified by major industry groups. The statistics provided in the Corporations Returns Act report are presented at the 21-industry level, using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). Previous versions of this report may use different industry classification systems. The industry system used will be referenced within the specific version.

    Release date: 2019-09-11

  • Table: 63-238-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the real estate agents, brokers, appraisers and other real estate industries. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-02-27
Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (10 to 20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613122
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effects of changes in consumer spending and asset holdings over the last 20 years on the economic landscape.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • 12. Canada E-Book Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999021
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth, and are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. Changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can also affect consumer preferences, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of various goods and services.

    Based on Family Expenditure Survey data for both 1986 and 1996, this study examines how the household consumption of services has shifted over the past decade. Particular attention is paid to spending on: communications services; finance and real estate services; food and beverage services; traveler accommodation services; amusement and recreation services; and personal and household services. Insights are also provided on why household spending patterns for specific service commodities have changed from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-01-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

  • 16. Job stability Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Stats in brief: 63-016-X19980013844
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This brief descriptive article takes a glance at changes in the output levels for various major service industry groups and some specific service industries within these groups. The major service industry groups to be examined here include: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodation and food services; and leisure and personal services. These are the same industry groupings for which quarterly data are regularly presented in the latter half of this publication.

    Release date: 1998-07-10
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