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  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005015
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected industries serving the mining and/or forestry sectors, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005013
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected professional, scientific and technical service industries, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20
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  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005015
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected industries serving the mining and/or forestry sectors, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005013
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected professional, scientific and technical service industries, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20
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