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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on changes in the production of Canada's forest industries. This article is published as part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the role of natural resources in the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-07-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2007017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper empirically investigates how the Canadian economy has evolved following the rise in commodity prices and appreciation of the Canadian dollar that began in 2003. The adjustment in the manufacturing industry has garnered the greatest attention because it has borne the brunt of job losses. However, the adjustment of the manufacturing industry has not been straightforward. Rather, a complex reallocation has been taking place within manufacturing that has been predominantly due to the integration of emerging nations into the global economy. The increased commodity prices and falling manufactured prices caused by this integration have affected durable and non-durable manufacturing industries differently. Non-durable manufacturers have tended to see their competitiveness eroded and their output has tended to fall. Durable manufacturers, on the other hand, have increased output in response to the resource boom and increased demand in general. The result has been stable manufacturing output overall, accompanied by a re-orientation of manufacturing output away from non-durables and toward durables.

    The appreciated dollar and higher commodity prices have also led to a more widespread industrial reallocation in Canada. The higher commodity prices have started a resource boom, particularly in Alberta. The boom has led to rising resource industry employment, while manufacturing employment declined, and to rising service-sector employment. It has contributed to inter-provincial migration, and has greatly increased the purchasing power of Canadian incomes as terms of trade have improved.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21
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Analysis (15)

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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on changes in the production of Canada's forest industries. This article is published as part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the role of natural resources in the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-07-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2007017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper empirically investigates how the Canadian economy has evolved following the rise in commodity prices and appreciation of the Canadian dollar that began in 2003. The adjustment in the manufacturing industry has garnered the greatest attention because it has borne the brunt of job losses. However, the adjustment of the manufacturing industry has not been straightforward. Rather, a complex reallocation has been taking place within manufacturing that has been predominantly due to the integration of emerging nations into the global economy. The increased commodity prices and falling manufactured prices caused by this integration have affected durable and non-durable manufacturing industries differently. Non-durable manufacturers have tended to see their competitiveness eroded and their output has tended to fall. Durable manufacturers, on the other hand, have increased output in response to the resource boom and increased demand in general. The result has been stable manufacturing output overall, accompanied by a re-orientation of manufacturing output away from non-durables and toward durables.

    The appreciated dollar and higher commodity prices have also led to a more widespread industrial reallocation in Canada. The higher commodity prices have started a resource boom, particularly in Alberta. The boom has led to rising resource industry employment, while manufacturing employment declined, and to rising service-sector employment. It has contributed to inter-provincial migration, and has greatly increased the purchasing power of Canadian incomes as terms of trade have improved.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21
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