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  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961-2004. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examines employment, unemployment, work activity, earnings, industrial structure, industry concentration and diversity, and human capital and population growth due to immigration and inter-CMA mobility in Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) between 1981 and 2001.

    Employment and unemployment rates of Census Metropolitan Area residents in 2001 were at similar levels as twenty years earlier. This despite major changes in the structure of urban economies and in particular the declining importance of manufacturing, and rising employment of business services industries.

    The labour market strength of Canada's largest urban areas varied tremendously in 2001, although the difference between the CMAs with the strongest and weakest labour markets had declined since 1981.

    Immigrants, low-paid workers and young workers lost ground in the labour market between 1981 and 2001. Over the same period women made gains in employment and earnings relative to men.

    University degree holders were highly concentrated in CMAs in 2001. Recent immigrants made a substantial contribution to the growth in the human capital pool in some CMAs between 1996 and 2001. Many small CMAs lost highly educated and young persons to larger CMAs over the same period.

    The report uses the 1981, 1991, and 2001 censuses of Canada, and the 1987-2003 Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005248
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the evolution of low-paid work and the position of economically vulnerable families in Canada over the last two decades. Despite substantial growth in workers' educational attainment and experience, the proportion of jobs paying less than $10.00 per hour has remained fairly stable since the early 1980s. However, union coverage in low-paid jobs has dropped, especially for males. The risk of job loss has changed little but the proportion of newly hired employees who hold temporary jobs has increased markedly, thereby indicating important changes in the employer-employee relationship. Despite their rising educational attainment, most low earners (except women aged 25 to 29) have not seen their chances of escaping low earnings improved between the 1980s and the 1990s.

    Of all full-time employees, 5% were low-paid and lived in low income families in 1980 and 2000. In 2000, individuals with no high school diploma, recent immigrants, unattached individuals, lone mothers and persons living alone accounted for fully 71% of all full-time workers in low-paid jobs and in low-income, but only 37% of all full-time workers. While members of these five groups account for the majority of low-paid workers in low-income families, two of these groups have seen their economic position declined significantly: low-educated couples and recent immigrants.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040067780
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 1998 International Adult Literacy Survey to examine the contribution of educational attainment and literacy skills to economic growth and the earnings of individuals.

    Release date: 2005-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25
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  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961-2004. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examines employment, unemployment, work activity, earnings, industrial structure, industry concentration and diversity, and human capital and population growth due to immigration and inter-CMA mobility in Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) between 1981 and 2001.

    Employment and unemployment rates of Census Metropolitan Area residents in 2001 were at similar levels as twenty years earlier. This despite major changes in the structure of urban economies and in particular the declining importance of manufacturing, and rising employment of business services industries.

    The labour market strength of Canada's largest urban areas varied tremendously in 2001, although the difference between the CMAs with the strongest and weakest labour markets had declined since 1981.

    Immigrants, low-paid workers and young workers lost ground in the labour market between 1981 and 2001. Over the same period women made gains in employment and earnings relative to men.

    University degree holders were highly concentrated in CMAs in 2001. Recent immigrants made a substantial contribution to the growth in the human capital pool in some CMAs between 1996 and 2001. Many small CMAs lost highly educated and young persons to larger CMAs over the same period.

    The report uses the 1981, 1991, and 2001 censuses of Canada, and the 1987-2003 Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005248
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the evolution of low-paid work and the position of economically vulnerable families in Canada over the last two decades. Despite substantial growth in workers' educational attainment and experience, the proportion of jobs paying less than $10.00 per hour has remained fairly stable since the early 1980s. However, union coverage in low-paid jobs has dropped, especially for males. The risk of job loss has changed little but the proportion of newly hired employees who hold temporary jobs has increased markedly, thereby indicating important changes in the employer-employee relationship. Despite their rising educational attainment, most low earners (except women aged 25 to 29) have not seen their chances of escaping low earnings improved between the 1980s and the 1990s.

    Of all full-time employees, 5% were low-paid and lived in low income families in 1980 and 2000. In 2000, individuals with no high school diploma, recent immigrants, unattached individuals, lone mothers and persons living alone accounted for fully 71% of all full-time workers in low-paid jobs and in low-income, but only 37% of all full-time workers. While members of these five groups account for the majority of low-paid workers in low-income families, two of these groups have seen their economic position declined significantly: low-educated couples and recent immigrants.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040067780
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 1998 International Adult Literacy Survey to examine the contribution of educational attainment and literacy skills to economic growth and the earnings of individuals.

    Release date: 2005-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25
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