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  • 1. Canada E-Book Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003193
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction of the contribution of plant turnover to productivity growth is due to multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms closing down and opening up new plants. The plants opened up by multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms are typically much more productive than those opened by single-plant or domestic-controlled.

    Release date: 2003-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003172
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    All countries look to economic growth to reduce low-income. This paper focuses on the 1990s and assesses the role played by changes in economic growth, employment earnings and government transfers in the patterns of low-income intensity in Canada during the 1990s. We find that low-income intensity was higher in most provinces during the 1990s than during the 1980s (comparing comparable positions in the business cycle). The largest increase was in Ontario. In particular, in spite of the slow economic growth and falling unemployment between 1993 and 1997, low-income intensity continued to rise. Both increases in the low-income rate and the low-income gaps contributed to this higher level. Employment earnings continued to decline among low-income families over the 1990s, contributing to the increase in low-income intensity in central and eastern Canada in particular. This is related in part to the more severe recession of the early 1990s east of Manitoba, and the lack of recovery among poorer families. During the 1990s changes in government transfers did not offset the fall in employment earnings among lower-income families, as they did during the 1980s, resulting in rising low-income intensity. Declining transfer benefits were associated with a rising low-income gap in some provinces, particularly Alberta. The latest data available at the time of writing was 1998. The strong economic growth of 1999 and 2000 will likely have reduced low-income intensity, but it remains to be seen if it falls back to the level of the 1980s cyclical peak.

    Release date: 2003-01-24
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  • 1. Canada E-Book Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003193
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction of the contribution of plant turnover to productivity growth is due to multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms closing down and opening up new plants. The plants opened up by multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms are typically much more productive than those opened by single-plant or domestic-controlled.

    Release date: 2003-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003172
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    All countries look to economic growth to reduce low-income. This paper focuses on the 1990s and assesses the role played by changes in economic growth, employment earnings and government transfers in the patterns of low-income intensity in Canada during the 1990s. We find that low-income intensity was higher in most provinces during the 1990s than during the 1980s (comparing comparable positions in the business cycle). The largest increase was in Ontario. In particular, in spite of the slow economic growth and falling unemployment between 1993 and 1997, low-income intensity continued to rise. Both increases in the low-income rate and the low-income gaps contributed to this higher level. Employment earnings continued to decline among low-income families over the 1990s, contributing to the increase in low-income intensity in central and eastern Canada in particular. This is related in part to the more severe recession of the early 1990s east of Manitoba, and the lack of recovery among poorer families. During the 1990s changes in government transfers did not offset the fall in employment earnings among lower-income families, as they did during the 1980s, resulting in rising low-income intensity. Declining transfer benefits were associated with a rising low-income gap in some provinces, particularly Alberta. The latest data available at the time of writing was 1998. The strong economic growth of 1999 and 2000 will likely have reduced low-income intensity, but it remains to be seen if it falls back to the level of the 1980s cyclical peak.

    Release date: 2003-01-24
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