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  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010413247
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2009, the labour market contracted after 16 straight years of employment growth. Using a number of sources, this review highlights the trends behind the headline unemployment rate: where jobs were lost, who was most affected and how hours of work changed. The report also identifies some relatively bright spots and draws comparisons with the U.S. and other advanced economies.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data to examine changes in labour productivity, real gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income (GDI), economic aggregates and relative economic growth over time. Real GDI combines changes in production (real GDP), with a trading gain derived from relative price changes. The paper considers two sources of trading gains: the terms of trade and the real exchange rate. For OECD countries, the terms of trade is the more important price ratio, making a contribution to real income growth that is, on average, an order of magnitude larger than the real exchange rate.

    Over long time periods, the most important source of real income growth is changes in production. Over shorter time horizons, however, the trading gain can make noteworthy contributions. Changes in aggregates, like real private consumption or the relative economic performance of nations, are shown to be particularly dependent on the trading gain during the large swings in resource prices that occurred after 2002.

    Release date: 2010-01-28
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  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010413247
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2009, the labour market contracted after 16 straight years of employment growth. Using a number of sources, this review highlights the trends behind the headline unemployment rate: where jobs were lost, who was most affected and how hours of work changed. The report also identifies some relatively bright spots and draws comparisons with the U.S. and other advanced economies.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data to examine changes in labour productivity, real gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income (GDI), economic aggregates and relative economic growth over time. Real GDI combines changes in production (real GDP), with a trading gain derived from relative price changes. The paper considers two sources of trading gains: the terms of trade and the real exchange rate. For OECD countries, the terms of trade is the more important price ratio, making a contribution to real income growth that is, on average, an order of magnitude larger than the real exchange rate.

    Over long time periods, the most important source of real income growth is changes in production. Over shorter time horizons, however, the trading gain can make noteworthy contributions. Changes in aggregates, like real private consumption or the relative economic performance of nations, are shown to be particularly dependent on the trading gain during the large swings in resource prices that occurred after 2002.

    Release date: 2010-01-28
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