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All (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • 1. Job stability Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998004
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1998005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report gives an overview of the growing literature on the contribution of new technology to economic growth. It starts at the macroeconomic level and then it examines the contribution of new technology to economic performance of industries and firms.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Stats in brief: 63-016-X19980013844
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This brief descriptive article takes a glance at changes in the output levels for various major service industry groups and some specific service industries within these groups. The major service industry groups to be examined here include: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodation and food services; and leisure and personal services. These are the same industry groupings for which quarterly data are regularly presented in the latter half of this publication.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1998003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides an in-depth exploration of the links between literacy and economic security.

    Release date: 1998-05-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970043732
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is an overview of findings from the 1995 Follow-up Survey of 1990 Graduates. The information is directed to policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 1998-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033622
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article seeks to shed light on the early careers of science and engineering graduates over the last decade in Canada. It examines the evolution of employment patterns, earnings levels and other employment indicators of recent graduates, as well as their ability to find meaningful and satisfying work and to set out on rewarding and productive careers. The analysis is based on three cohorts of the National Graduates Survey (NGS) databases, which consist of large, representative samples of Canadian university graduates who completed their programs in 1982, 1986 and 1990 respectively. Each group was interviewed two and five years after graduation.

    Release date: 1998-03-04
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • 1. Job stability Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998004
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1998005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report gives an overview of the growing literature on the contribution of new technology to economic growth. It starts at the macroeconomic level and then it examines the contribution of new technology to economic performance of industries and firms.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Stats in brief: 63-016-X19980013844
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This brief descriptive article takes a glance at changes in the output levels for various major service industry groups and some specific service industries within these groups. The major service industry groups to be examined here include: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodation and food services; and leisure and personal services. These are the same industry groupings for which quarterly data are regularly presented in the latter half of this publication.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1998003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides an in-depth exploration of the links between literacy and economic security.

    Release date: 1998-05-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970043732
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is an overview of findings from the 1995 Follow-up Survey of 1990 Graduates. The information is directed to policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 1998-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033622
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article seeks to shed light on the early careers of science and engineering graduates over the last decade in Canada. It examines the evolution of employment patterns, earnings levels and other employment indicators of recent graduates, as well as their ability to find meaningful and satisfying work and to set out on rewarding and productive careers. The analysis is based on three cohorts of the National Graduates Survey (NGS) databases, which consist of large, representative samples of Canadian university graduates who completed their programs in 1982, 1986 and 1990 respectively. Each group was interviewed two and five years after graduation.

    Release date: 1998-03-04
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