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  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019011
    Description:

    This article examines the dwelling satisfaction of Canadian households using data from the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). In order to provide a high-level overview, the results are presented using geographic area of residence, housing tenure, and dwelling type as an organizing framework.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019012
    Description:

    This article examines neighbourhood satisfaction of Canadian households based on the results of the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). The neighbourhood satisfaction level of the principal decision maker (the 'household reference person') is examined alongside satisfaction with selected neighbourhood items-such as neighbourhood disorder, safety and services-and socio-demographic and household characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016383
    Description:

    This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20
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  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019011
    Description:

    This article examines the dwelling satisfaction of Canadian households using data from the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). In order to provide a high-level overview, the results are presented using geographic area of residence, housing tenure, and dwelling type as an organizing framework.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019012
    Description:

    This article examines neighbourhood satisfaction of Canadian households based on the results of the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). The neighbourhood satisfaction level of the principal decision maker (the 'household reference person') is examined alongside satisfaction with selected neighbourhood items-such as neighbourhood disorder, safety and services-and socio-demographic and household characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016383
    Description:

    This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20
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