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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-539-X
    Description:

    This document brings together guidelines and checklists on many issues that need to be considered in the pursuit of quality objectives in the execution of statistical activities. Its focus is on how to assure quality through effective and appropriate design or redesign of a statistical project or program from inception through to data evaluation, dissemination and documentation. These guidelines draw on the collective knowledge and experience of many Statistics Canada employees. It is expected that Quality Guidelines will be useful to staff engaged in the planning and design of surveys and other statistical projects, as well as to those who evaluate and analyze the outputs of these projects.

    Release date: 2019-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2018-09-07

  • Notices and consultations: 92-136-G
    Description:

    As is the case in advance of each Census, content consultations are being held with data users. The Census Content Consultation Guide gives you the opportunity to provide input.

    Release date: 2017-08-31

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010955
    Description:

    Survey managers are still discovering the usefulness of digital audio recording for monitoring and managing field staff. Its value so far has been for confirming the authenticity of interviews, detecting curbstoning, offering a concrete basis for feedback on interviewing performance and giving data collection managers an intimate view of in-person interviews. In addition, computer audio-recorded interviewing (CARI) can improve other aspects of survey data quality, offering corroboration or correction of response coding by field staff. Audio recordings may replace or supplement in-field verbatim transcription of free responses, and speech-to-text technology might make this technique more efficient in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010968
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has embarked on a program of increasing and improving the usage of imaging technology for paper survey questionnaires. The goal is to make the process an efficient, reliable and cost effective method of capturing survey data. The objective is to continue using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to capture the data from questionnaires, documents and faxes received whilst improving the process integration and Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QC) of the data capture process. These improvements are discussed in this paper.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010969
    Description:

    In a multi-divisional initiative within the U. S. Census Bureau, a highly sophisticated and innovative system was developed and implemented for the capturing, tracking, and scanning of respondent data that implements Intelligent Character Recognition (ICR), Optical Character Recognition (OCR), Optical Mark Recognition (OMR), and keying technology with heavy emphasis on error detection and control. The system, known as the integrated Computer Assisted Data Entry (iCADE) System, provides digital imaging of respondent questionnaires which are then processed by a combination of imaging algorithms, sent through Optical Mark Recognition (OMR) to collect check box data, and automatically collect and send only write-in areas to data-keying staff for the data capture process. These capabilities have produced great efficiencies in the data capture process and have led to a novel and efficient approach to post-collection activities.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010970
    Description:

    RTI International is currently conducting a longitudinal education study. One component of the study involved collecting transcripts and course catalogs from high schools that the sample members attended. Information from the transcripts and course catalogs also needed to be keyed and coded. This presented a challenge because the transcripts and course catalogs were collected from different types of schools, including public, private, and religious schools, from across the nation and they varied widely in both content and format. The challenge called for a sophisticated system that could be used by multiple users simultaneously. RTI developed such a system possessing all the characteristics of a high-end, high-tech, multi-user, multitask, user-friendly and low maintenance cost high school transcript and course catalog keying and coding system. The system is web based and has three major functions: transcript and catalog keying and coding, transcript and catalog keying quality control (keyer-coder end), and transcript and catalog coding QC (management end). Given the complex nature of transcript and catalog keying and coding, the system was designed to be flexible and to have the ability to transport keyed and coded data throughout the system to reduce the keying time, the ability to logically guide users through all the pages that a type of activity required, the ability to display appropriate information to help keying performance, and the ability to track all the keying, coding, and QC activities. Hundreds of catalogs and thousands of transcripts were successfully keyed, coded, and verified using the system. This paper will report on the system needs and design, implementation tips, problems faced and their solutions, and lessons learned.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010975
    Description:

    A major issue in official statistics is the availability of objective measures supporting the based-on-fact decision process. Istat has developed an Information System to assess survey quality. Among other standard quality indicators, nonresponse rates are systematically computed and stored for all surveys. Such a rich information base permits analysis over time and comparisons among surveys. The paper focuses on the analysis of interrelationships between data collection mode and other survey characteristics on total nonresponse. Particular attention is devoted to the extent to which multi-mode data collection improves response rates.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010978
    Description:

    Census developers and social researchers are at a critical juncture in determining collection modes of the future. Internet data collection is technically feasible, but the initial investment in hardware and software is costly. Given the great divide in computer knowledge and access, internet data collection is viable for some, but not for all. Therefore internet cannot fully replace the existing paper questionnaire - at least not in the near future.

    Canada, Australia and New Zealand are pioneers in internet data collection as an option for completing the census. This paper studies four driving forces behind this collection mode: 1) responding to social/public expectations; 2) longer term economic benefits; 3) improved data quality; and 4) improved coverage.

    Issues currently being faced are: 1) estimating internet uptake and maximizing benefits without undue risk; 2) designing a questionnaire for multiple modes; 3) producing multiple public communication approaches; and 4) gaining positive public reaction and trust in using the internet.

    This paper summarizes the countries' collective thinking and experiences on the benefits and limitation of internet data collection for a census of population and dwellings. It also provides an outline of where countries are heading in terms of internet data collection in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Table: 84-214-X
    Description:

    This compendium of vital statistics includes summary data on births, deaths, marriages and divorces. The introduction covers the data sources, data quality, and methods pertaining to each event, and includes a glossary defining the terms used. The first chapter is a brief overview of vital statistics for 1996. Subsequent chapters treat marriage, divorce, birth, fetal and infant mortality, total mortality, causes of death, vital statistics by census division, and international comparisons. Most charts and tables show Canada data for 1986 though 1996, while the charts and tables for causes of death show Canada data for 1979 through1996. Data for the provinces and territories are usually shown for 1995 and 1996. Appendices include population denominator data, age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) calculation methods, and leading causes of death methodology.

    Release date: 1999-11-25
Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010955
    Description:

    Survey managers are still discovering the usefulness of digital audio recording for monitoring and managing field staff. Its value so far has been for confirming the authenticity of interviews, detecting curbstoning, offering a concrete basis for feedback on interviewing performance and giving data collection managers an intimate view of in-person interviews. In addition, computer audio-recorded interviewing (CARI) can improve other aspects of survey data quality, offering corroboration or correction of response coding by field staff. Audio recordings may replace or supplement in-field verbatim transcription of free responses, and speech-to-text technology might make this technique more efficient in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010968
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has embarked on a program of increasing and improving the usage of imaging technology for paper survey questionnaires. The goal is to make the process an efficient, reliable and cost effective method of capturing survey data. The objective is to continue using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to capture the data from questionnaires, documents and faxes received whilst improving the process integration and Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QC) of the data capture process. These improvements are discussed in this paper.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010969
    Description:

    In a multi-divisional initiative within the U. S. Census Bureau, a highly sophisticated and innovative system was developed and implemented for the capturing, tracking, and scanning of respondent data that implements Intelligent Character Recognition (ICR), Optical Character Recognition (OCR), Optical Mark Recognition (OMR), and keying technology with heavy emphasis on error detection and control. The system, known as the integrated Computer Assisted Data Entry (iCADE) System, provides digital imaging of respondent questionnaires which are then processed by a combination of imaging algorithms, sent through Optical Mark Recognition (OMR) to collect check box data, and automatically collect and send only write-in areas to data-keying staff for the data capture process. These capabilities have produced great efficiencies in the data capture process and have led to a novel and efficient approach to post-collection activities.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010970
    Description:

    RTI International is currently conducting a longitudinal education study. One component of the study involved collecting transcripts and course catalogs from high schools that the sample members attended. Information from the transcripts and course catalogs also needed to be keyed and coded. This presented a challenge because the transcripts and course catalogs were collected from different types of schools, including public, private, and religious schools, from across the nation and they varied widely in both content and format. The challenge called for a sophisticated system that could be used by multiple users simultaneously. RTI developed such a system possessing all the characteristics of a high-end, high-tech, multi-user, multitask, user-friendly and low maintenance cost high school transcript and course catalog keying and coding system. The system is web based and has three major functions: transcript and catalog keying and coding, transcript and catalog keying quality control (keyer-coder end), and transcript and catalog coding QC (management end). Given the complex nature of transcript and catalog keying and coding, the system was designed to be flexible and to have the ability to transport keyed and coded data throughout the system to reduce the keying time, the ability to logically guide users through all the pages that a type of activity required, the ability to display appropriate information to help keying performance, and the ability to track all the keying, coding, and QC activities. Hundreds of catalogs and thousands of transcripts were successfully keyed, coded, and verified using the system. This paper will report on the system needs and design, implementation tips, problems faced and their solutions, and lessons learned.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010975
    Description:

    A major issue in official statistics is the availability of objective measures supporting the based-on-fact decision process. Istat has developed an Information System to assess survey quality. Among other standard quality indicators, nonresponse rates are systematically computed and stored for all surveys. Such a rich information base permits analysis over time and comparisons among surveys. The paper focuses on the analysis of interrelationships between data collection mode and other survey characteristics on total nonresponse. Particular attention is devoted to the extent to which multi-mode data collection improves response rates.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010978
    Description:

    Census developers and social researchers are at a critical juncture in determining collection modes of the future. Internet data collection is technically feasible, but the initial investment in hardware and software is costly. Given the great divide in computer knowledge and access, internet data collection is viable for some, but not for all. Therefore internet cannot fully replace the existing paper questionnaire - at least not in the near future.

    Canada, Australia and New Zealand are pioneers in internet data collection as an option for completing the census. This paper studies four driving forces behind this collection mode: 1) responding to social/public expectations; 2) longer term economic benefits; 3) improved data quality; and 4) improved coverage.

    Issues currently being faced are: 1) estimating internet uptake and maximizing benefits without undue risk; 2) designing a questionnaire for multiple modes; 3) producing multiple public communication approaches; and 4) gaining positive public reaction and trust in using the internet.

    This paper summarizes the countries' collective thinking and experiences on the benefits and limitation of internet data collection for a census of population and dwellings. It also provides an outline of where countries are heading in terms of internet data collection in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010980
    Description:

    A census is the largest and possibly one of the most complex data collection operations undertaken by a government. Many of the challenges encountered are linked to the sheer size of the operation, when millions of dwellings need to be contacted, and thousands of people must be mobilized to help in the data collection efforts. Statistics Canada is a world leader in its approaches to census data collection. New collection approaches were introduced with the 2006 Census, more particularly an Internet response option, to add to the mail-out, telephone and face-to-face collection approaches. Such diversity in data collection methods requires an integrated approach to management to ensure quality and efficiency in an environment of declining survey response rates and a tighter fiscal framework. In preparing for its' 2011 Census, Statistics Canada is putting in place a number of new systems and processes to actively manage field data collection operations. One of the key elements of the approach will be a Field Management System which will allow the majority of field personnel to register enumeration progress in the field, and be informed in a very timely fashion of questionnaires received at the Data Operations Centre via Internet, by mail or other channels, thus informing them to cease non-response follow up efforts on those dwellings, in an attempt to eliminate unnecessary follow-up work.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010981
    Description:

    One of the main characteristics of the 2001 Spanish Census of the Population was the use of an administrative Register of Population (El Padrón) for pre-printing the questionnaires and also the enumerator's record books of the census sections. In this paper we present the main characteristics of the relationship between the Population Register and Census of Population, and the main changes that are being foreseen for the next Census that will take place in 2011.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011011
    Description:

    The Federation of Canadian Municipalities' (FCM) Quality of Life Reporting System (QOLRS) is a means by which to measure, monitor, and report on the quality of life in Canadian municipalities. To address that challenge of administrative data collection across member municipalities the QOLRS technical team collaborated on the development of the Municipal Data Collection Tool (MDCT) which has become a key component of QOLRS' data acquisition methodology. Offered as a case study on administrative data collection, this paper argues that the recent launch of the MDCT has enabled the FCM to access reliable pan-Canadian municipal administrative data for the QOLRS.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-539-X
    Description:

    This document brings together guidelines and checklists on many issues that need to be considered in the pursuit of quality objectives in the execution of statistical activities. Its focus is on how to assure quality through effective and appropriate design or redesign of a statistical project or program from inception through to data evaluation, dissemination and documentation. These guidelines draw on the collective knowledge and experience of many Statistics Canada employees. It is expected that Quality Guidelines will be useful to staff engaged in the planning and design of surveys and other statistical projects, as well as to those who evaluate and analyze the outputs of these projects.

    Release date: 2019-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2018-09-07

  • Notices and consultations: 92-136-G
    Description:

    As is the case in advance of each Census, content consultations are being held with data users. The Census Content Consultation Guide gives you the opportunity to provide input.

    Release date: 2017-08-31

  • Notices and consultations: 92-131-G
    Description:

    This guide has been developed to help users convey their ideas and suggestions to Statistics Canada regarding the 2001 Census products and services line. It contains a series of questions about specific dissemination issues and topics related to the 2001 Census dissemination strategy. The document covers many aspects of census dissemination. Readers are welcome to focus on sections of particular interest to them. In addition, users are welcome to provide comments on any other census-related issues during this consultation process.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Notices and consultations: 92-130-X
    Description:

    This report describes the comments received as a result of the 2006 Census questionnaire consultation process. In preparation for the next census, Statistics Canada has continued its tradition of consulting data users and other interested persons for their views on the content of the 2006 Census questionnaire. Based on feedback received during previous consultations, Statistics Canada decided to implement a new integrated consultation approach. With a broader spectrum than just the 2006 Census content, this new model also encouraged discussions on the 2001 Census data dissemination process and different geographic concepts.

    This round of consultation was held in two phases. The first phase invited data users to submit their written suggestions. The second phase included meetings with data users to discuss, in greater detail, comments brought forth during the first phase. It allowed for a thorough analysis on data users' specific needs prior to meetings and was instrumental in identifying Statistics Canada's participation. According to the feedback received, data users appreciated this new consultation process.

    Consultations on the content of the 2006 Census were held from June to December 2002. Over 75 written submissions were received and more than 25 meetings were organized throughout Canada, totalling approximately 800 comments.

    Release date: 2004-03-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-602-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of existing methods and techniques making use of personal identifiers to support record linkage. Record linkage can be loosely defined as a methodology for manipulating and / or transforming personal identifiers from individual data records from one or more operational databases and subsequently attempting to match these personal identifiers to create a composite record about an individual. Record linkage is not intended to uniquely identify individuals for operational purposes; however, it does provide probabilistic matches of varying degrees of reliability for use in statistical reporting. Techniques employed in record linkage may also be of use for investigative purposes to help narrow the field of search against existing databases when some form of personal identification information exists.

    Release date: 2000-12-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000010
    Description:

    This report explains the concept of income and provides definitions of the various sources of income and derived income variables. It also documents the various aspects of the census that can have an impact on census income estimates.

    Release date: 2000-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19990024878
    Description:

    In his paper Fritz Scheuren considers the possible uses of administrative records to enhance and improve population censuses. After reviewing previous uses of administrative records in an international context, he puts forward several proposals for research and development towards increased use of administrative records in the American statistical system.

    Release date: 2000-03-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19990014710
    Description:

    Most statistical offices select the sample of commodities of which prices are collected for their Consumer Price Indexes with non-probability techniques. In the Netherlands, and in many other countries as well, those judgemental sampling methods come close to some kind of cut-off selection, in which a large part of the population (usually the items with the lowest expenditures) is deliberately left unobserved. This method obviously yields biased price index numbers. The question arises whether probability sampling would lead to better results in terms of the mean square error. We have considered simple random sampling, stratified sampling and systematic sampling proportional to expenditure. Monte Carlo simulations using scanner data on coffee, baby's napkins and toilet paper were carried out to assess the performance of the four sampling designs. Surprisingly perhaps, cut-off selection is shown to be a successful strategy for item sampling in the consumer price index.

    Release date: 1999-10-08
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