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All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Table: 21-023-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report details the methodology and results of the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS).

    The FEMS is conducted to gather information about farming practices on Canadian crop and livestock operations. The survey focuses on information related to manure storage and spreading, pesticide application, crop and nutrient management, grazing and the implementation of environmental farm plans.

    Release date: 2013-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800310688
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Tillage involves preparing soil for planting or seeding by plowing, cultivating or otherwise turning it. Using data from the Census of Agriculture, this study examines conventional, conservation and no-till practices across the country.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050068759
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Zero tillage is a relatively recent innovation on Canadadian farms however, it may not always be suitable for all crop and soil conditions. Zero till practices matched appropriately to crop and field conditions have the potential to reduce agriculture's impacts on the environment and lower energy and labour costs. The main sources of data are from Statistics Canada's 2001 Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) and the 2001 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2005-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-021-M2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Grazing Management in Canada presents information on various characteristics of livestock grazing management as practised on Canadian farms. Canadian farmers are actively involved in environmental initiatives and are adopting farming practices that minimize pollution risks to air, water and soil, while contributing to the conservation of biodiversity. The FEMS results presented here provide an overview of grazing practices. However, management practices that could be protective or detrimental to the environment and that relate to grazing systems are much broader than those included in this bulletin. Further, regional differences in climate and soil quality mean that there is no "optimal" or "correct" grazing practice that is applicable throughout the whole country or even within an individual province.

    In this paper, discussion focuses on farms with grazing cattle that derive 51% or more of their gross farm receipts from either beef or dairy production. Results show that grazing management practice varies by region of Canada and by farm size.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004015
    Description:

    This activity focusses on the increase in potato production in Western Canada. It discusses how scientists and growers are discovering that soil and climate conditions in Western Canada are well suited to growing potatoes.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Table: 95F0301X
    Description:

    This product presents basic counts and totals for all 2001 Census of Agriculture farm variables, including number and type of farms; crop, horticulture and land use areas; land management practices; numbers of livestock and poultry; organic farming; computer use; farm machinery and equipment; farm capital; and farm operating expenses and receipts. It provides a comprehensive picture of the agriculture industry across Canada.These data from the initial release of the 2001 Census of Agriculture are available at the Canada, province, territory, census agricultural region (CAR) and census division (CD) levels.This product replaces the series of eight Agricultural Profile publications (one for Canada, one for the Atlantic Provinces, and one for each of the other six provinces) produced for the 1996 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2002-05-15
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 21-023-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report details the methodology and results of the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS).

    The FEMS is conducted to gather information about farming practices on Canadian crop and livestock operations. The survey focuses on information related to manure storage and spreading, pesticide application, crop and nutrient management, grazing and the implementation of environmental farm plans.

    Release date: 2013-10-09

  • Table: 95F0301X
    Description:

    This product presents basic counts and totals for all 2001 Census of Agriculture farm variables, including number and type of farms; crop, horticulture and land use areas; land management practices; numbers of livestock and poultry; organic farming; computer use; farm machinery and equipment; farm capital; and farm operating expenses and receipts. It provides a comprehensive picture of the agriculture industry across Canada.These data from the initial release of the 2001 Census of Agriculture are available at the Canada, province, territory, census agricultural region (CAR) and census division (CD) levels.This product replaces the series of eight Agricultural Profile publications (one for Canada, one for the Atlantic Provinces, and one for each of the other six provinces) produced for the 1996 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2002-05-15
Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800310688
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Tillage involves preparing soil for planting or seeding by plowing, cultivating or otherwise turning it. Using data from the Census of Agriculture, this study examines conventional, conservation and no-till practices across the country.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050068759
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Zero tillage is a relatively recent innovation on Canadadian farms however, it may not always be suitable for all crop and soil conditions. Zero till practices matched appropriately to crop and field conditions have the potential to reduce agriculture's impacts on the environment and lower energy and labour costs. The main sources of data are from Statistics Canada's 2001 Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) and the 2001 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2005-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-021-M2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Grazing Management in Canada presents information on various characteristics of livestock grazing management as practised on Canadian farms. Canadian farmers are actively involved in environmental initiatives and are adopting farming practices that minimize pollution risks to air, water and soil, while contributing to the conservation of biodiversity. The FEMS results presented here provide an overview of grazing practices. However, management practices that could be protective or detrimental to the environment and that relate to grazing systems are much broader than those included in this bulletin. Further, regional differences in climate and soil quality mean that there is no "optimal" or "correct" grazing practice that is applicable throughout the whole country or even within an individual province.

    In this paper, discussion focuses on farms with grazing cattle that derive 51% or more of their gross farm receipts from either beef or dairy production. Results show that grazing management practice varies by region of Canada and by farm size.

    Release date: 2005-03-23
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004015
    Description:

    This activity focusses on the increase in potato production in Western Canada. It discusses how scientists and growers are discovering that soil and climate conditions in Western Canada are well suited to growing potatoes.

    Release date: 2004-10-29
Date modified: