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  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019012
    Description:

    This infographic examines the activities during the 12 months prior to September 2018 for 15- to 29-year-olds who were not in employment, education or training (NEET) in that month. The analysis is based on the one-time addition of questions on this topic to the Labour Force Survey in September 2018. At that time, 11.3% of young Canadians between 15 and 29 were NEET.

    Release date: 2019-02-13

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999.

    Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    Previous research on postsecondary participation of Canadian youth found that no one factor can fully account for who goes on to postsecondary education. There was, instead, a wide variety of characteristics which distinguish youth who undertake postsecondary education from those who do not. This report will examine demographic and family characteristics, high school engagement, academic performance, and first year postsecondary experience of those who attended postsecondary education and those who did not or dropped out.

    Chapter 2 looks at the relationship between various demographic, family and school characteristics and youth participation in postsecondary education, with respect to the type of institution attended and the level of program taken in university (bachelors versus graduate studies).

    Chapter 3 analyses the relationship between the same characteristics and youth participation status in postsecondary education, that is graduates, continuers or drop outs.

    Chapter 4, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Table: 75-001-X19970033207
    Description:

    Is there a relationship between participation in adult education and unemployment? This article looks at trends in adult education from 1976 to 1996, and examines who goes back to school, according to age, sex, education already attained and family situation.

    Release date: 1997-09-10
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019012
    Description:

    This infographic examines the activities during the 12 months prior to September 2018 for 15- to 29-year-olds who were not in employment, education or training (NEET) in that month. The analysis is based on the one-time addition of questions on this topic to the Labour Force Survey in September 2018. At that time, 11.3% of young Canadians between 15 and 29 were NEET.

    Release date: 2019-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999.

    Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    Previous research on postsecondary participation of Canadian youth found that no one factor can fully account for who goes on to postsecondary education. There was, instead, a wide variety of characteristics which distinguish youth who undertake postsecondary education from those who do not. This report will examine demographic and family characteristics, high school engagement, academic performance, and first year postsecondary experience of those who attended postsecondary education and those who did not or dropped out.

    Chapter 2 looks at the relationship between various demographic, family and school characteristics and youth participation in postsecondary education, with respect to the type of institution attended and the level of program taken in university (bachelors versus graduate studies).

    Chapter 3 analyses the relationship between the same characteristics and youth participation status in postsecondary education, that is graduates, continuers or drop outs.

    Chapter 4, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006275
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study assesses the effects of literacy and numeracy skills on the labour market outcomes of Canadian high school drop-outs. We find that these skills have significant effects on the probability of being employed and on hours and weeks of work for both men and women, and also have strong (direct) influences on men's, but not women's, incomes. These findings imply that high school curricula that develop literacy and numeracy skills could provide significant returns even for those who do not complete their programs and wind up at the lower end of the labour market. Our findings similarly suggest that training programs catering to drop-outs could substantially improve these individuals' labour market outcomes by developing these basic skills. The results also have implications for dual labour market theory, since it is often assumed that the secondary market is characterized by minimal returns to human capital'contrary to what is found here.

    Release date: 2006-03-27
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-552-M2005013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report documents key aspects of the development of the International Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) - its theoretical roots, the domains selected for possible assessment, the approaches taken to assessment in each domain and the criteria that were employed to decide which domains were to be carried in the final design. As conceived, the ALL survey was meant to build on the success of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) assessments by extending the range of skills assessed and by improving the quality of the assessment methods employed. This report documents several successes including: · the development of a new framework and associated robust measures for problem solving · the development of a powerful numeracy framework and associated robust measures · the specification of frameworks for practical cognition, teamwork and information and communication technology literacy The report also provides insight into those domains where development failed to yield approaches to assessment of sufficient quality, insight that reminds us that scientific advance in this domain is hard won.

    Release date: 2005-03-24
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