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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111399
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) from 2003 and 2008 to explore consumers' propensity to choose some products and boycott others based on ethical criteria. It compares the evolution of citizens' ethical consumption to other types of political participation. It also provides information on the persons most likely to choose or boycott a product for ethical reasons.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study focuses on sales pattern for commodities sold by retailers in Canada. Canadians spent more of their retail dollar on frequently purchased goods such as food and beverages and automotive fuels, oils and additives in 2008 and less on big ticket items such as new vehicles. The only commodity group to decline in 2008 was motor vehicles, parts and services which made up one-fifth of total spending. The market share analysis shows that general merchandisers sold more food and beverages, sporting and leisure goods and housewares as a share of their total sales.

    Release date: 2009-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200800210669
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this article is a comprehensive statistical review of Canadian agriculture in 2007, a compilation of key statistical information along with the analysis and interpretations of Statistics Canada's commodity specialists.

    Release date: 2008-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800810675
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at how higher prices have affected households, and how consumers are adapting, as well as the impact of higher energy prices on exports and imports.

    Release date: 2008-08-14
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Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111399
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) from 2003 and 2008 to explore consumers' propensity to choose some products and boycott others based on ethical criteria. It compares the evolution of citizens' ethical consumption to other types of political participation. It also provides information on the persons most likely to choose or boycott a product for ethical reasons.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study focuses on sales pattern for commodities sold by retailers in Canada. Canadians spent more of their retail dollar on frequently purchased goods such as food and beverages and automotive fuels, oils and additives in 2008 and less on big ticket items such as new vehicles. The only commodity group to decline in 2008 was motor vehicles, parts and services which made up one-fifth of total spending. The market share analysis shows that general merchandisers sold more food and beverages, sporting and leisure goods and housewares as a share of their total sales.

    Release date: 2009-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200800210669
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this article is a comprehensive statistical review of Canadian agriculture in 2007, a compilation of key statistical information along with the analysis and interpretations of Statistics Canada's commodity specialists.

    Release date: 2008-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800810675
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at how higher prices have affected households, and how consumers are adapting, as well as the impact of higher energy prices on exports and imports.

    Release date: 2008-08-14
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