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  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to collect details on topics such as: i) the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs have been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; ii) the relationship between the graduates' program of study and the employment subsequently obtained; iii) the type of employment obtained and qualification requirements; iv) sources of funding for postsecondary education; and v) government-sponsored student loans and other sources of student debt. The survey results are directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and persons interested in public postsecondary education and graduates' transition from school to work.

    Release date: 2020-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0115X
    Description:

    This document provides a comprehensive reference to the information available from the General Social Survey (GSS). It provides a description of the content of each of the 18 GSS cycles (e.g. time use, social support, education, the family), as well as background information, target population and collection methodology. A list of the products and services available from each cycle is also included.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0011X
    Description:

    This overview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) provides information on the purpose, content, methodology and products and services pertaining to SLID. Its HTML, menu-driven format enables users to discover all main elements of the survey in one, easy-to-use document. This publication was designed for survey respondents, users of SLID data, researchers and analysts, and individuals who would like to learn more about the survey.

    The SLID is an important source for income data for Canadian families, households and individuals. Introduced in 1993, SLID provides an added dimension to traditional surveys on labour market activity and income: the changes experienced by individuals and families through time. At the heart of the survey's objectives is the understanding of the economic well-being of Canadians. SLID also provides information on a broad selection of human capital variables, labour force experiences and demographic characteristics such as education, family relationships and household composition. Its breadth of content, combined with a relatively large sample, makes it a unique and valuable dataset.

    With this release, users now have free access to the 202 CANSIM Series tables. Tables are accessible using a PC or Mac via the web browser.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Public use microdata: 82M0014X
    Description:

    Special Surveys Division was originally contacted by the Health Council of Canada (HCC) during the summer of 2006 to conduct the first iteration of this survey which resulted in the Canadian Survey of Experiences with Primary Health Care (CSE-PHC), 2006-2007 survey. The HCC was created when the First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal was signed in 2003. Their mandate is to report publicly on the progress of health care renewal in Canada. One of the Council's goals is to provide a system-wide perspective on health care reform to the Canadian public with a particular focus on issues related to accountability and transparency.

    Once the results of the 2006-2007 survey were released, work began on the 2007-2008 questionnaire. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) joined members of the HCC and the project team at Statistics Canada to begin shaping the 2007-2008 survey. The CIHI, which became a co-sponsor with the HCC, is an independent, national, not-for-profit organization working to improve the health of Canadians and the health care system by providing quality, reliable and timely health information. The research information they produce focuses on health care services, health spending and human resources working in the health sector, as well as issues surrounding the health of the population.

    The 2007-2008 survey differed from the 2006-2007 version in several ways. Along with some content changes, mostly around barriers to access and use of health care, the survey sample was expanded and a sampling strategy was developed to permit national as well as provincial level estimates of survey results. A new questionnaire was developed and tested with focus groups during the month of January 2008, in four cities across the country. The collection mode was also changed from a paper/pencil survey collected over the telephone in 2006-2007 to a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) application in 2007-2008. Collection began in three Statistics Canada regional offices in April and continued until the end of June 2008.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010940
    Description:

    Data Collection Methodology (DCM) enable the collection of good quality data by providing expert advice and assistance on questionnaire design, methods of evaluation and respondent engagement. DCM assist in the development of client skills, undertake research and lead innovation in data collection methods. This is done in a challenging environment of organisational change and limited resources. This paper will cover 'how DCM do business' with clients and the wider methodological community to achieve our goals.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010992
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was redesigned in 2007 so that it could use the continuous data collection method. Since then, a new sample has been selected every two months, and the data have also been collected over a two-month period. The survey uses two collection techniques: computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI) for the sample drawn from an area frame, and computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) for the sample selected from a telephone list frame. Statistics Canada has recently implemented some data collection initiatives to reduce the response burden and survey costs while maintaining or improving data quality. The new measures include the use of a call management tool in the CATI system and a limit on the number of calls. They help manage telephone calls and limit the number of attempts made to contact a respondent. In addition, with the paradata that became available very recently, reports are now being generated to assist in evaluating and monitoring collection procedures and efficiency in real time. The CCHS has also been selected to implement further collection initiatives in the future. This paper provides a brief description of the survey, explains the advantages of continuous collection and outlines the impact that the new initiatives have had on the survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010993
    Description:

    Until now, years of experience in questionnaire design were required to estimate how long it would take a respondent, on the average, to complete a CATI questionnaire for a new survey. This presentation focuses on a new method which produces interview time estimates for questionnaires at the development stage. The method uses Blaise Audit Trail data and previous surveys. It was developed, tested and verified for accuracy on some large scale surveys.

    First, audit trail data was used to determine the average time previous respondents have taken to answer specific types of questions. These would include questions that require a yes/no answer, scaled questions, "mark all that apply" questions, etc. Second, for any given questionnaire, the paths taken by population sub-groups were mapped to identify the series of questions answered by different types of respondents, and timed to determine what the longest possible interview time would be. Finally, the overall expected time it takes to complete the questionnaire is calculated using estimated proportions of the population expected to answer each question.

    So far, we used paradata to accurately estimate average respondent interview completion times. We note that the method that we developed could also be used to estimate specific respondent interview completion times.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010997
    Description:

    Over the past few years, Statistics Canada has conducted several analytical studies using paradata to learn more about various issues surrounding the data collection process and practices. In particular, these investigations have attempted to better understand how data collection progresses through its cycle, to identify strategic opportunities, to evaluate new collection initiatives and to improve the way the agency conducts and manages its surveys. The main objectives of this paper are to present the main results of these past and ongoing investigations describing Statistics Canada's experiences with regards to paradata. Future research plans that focus on identifying viable operational strategies that could improve efficiency or data quality are also discussed.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010999
    Description:

    The choice of number of call attempts in a telephone survey is an important decision. A large number of call attempts makes the data collection costly and time-consuming; and a small number of attempts decreases the response set from which conclusions are drawn and increases the variance. The decision can also have an effect on the nonresponse bias. In this paper we study the effects of number of call attempts on the nonresponse rate and the nonresponse bias in two surveys conducted by Statistics Sweden: The Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Household Finances (HF).

    By use of paradata we calculate the response rate as a function of the number of call attempts. To estimate the nonresponse bias we use estimates of some register variables, where observations are available for both respondents and nonrespondents. We also calculate estimates of some real survey parameters as functions of varying number of call attempts. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce the current number of call attempts without getting an increased nonresponse bias.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011001
    Description:

    Currently underway, the Québec Population Health Survey (EQSP), for which collection will wrap up in February 2009, provides an opportunity, because of the size of its sample, to assess the impact that sending out introductory letters to respondents has on the response rate in a controlled environment. Since this regional telephone survey is expected to have more than 38,000 respondents, it was possible to use part of its sample for this study without having too great an impact on its overall response rate. In random digit dialling (RDD) surveys such as the EQSP, one of the main challenges in sending out introductory letters is reaching the survey units. Doing so depends largely on our capacity to associate an address with the sample units and on the quality of that information.

    This article describes the controlled study proposed by the Institut de la statistique du Québec to measure the effect that sending out introductory letters to respondents had on the survey's response rate.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to collect details on topics such as: i) the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs have been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; ii) the relationship between the graduates' program of study and the employment subsequently obtained; iii) the type of employment obtained and qualification requirements; iv) sources of funding for postsecondary education; and v) government-sponsored student loans and other sources of student debt. The survey results are directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and persons interested in public postsecondary education and graduates' transition from school to work.

    Release date: 2020-01-14

  • Public use microdata: 82M0014X
    Description:

    Special Surveys Division was originally contacted by the Health Council of Canada (HCC) during the summer of 2006 to conduct the first iteration of this survey which resulted in the Canadian Survey of Experiences with Primary Health Care (CSE-PHC), 2006-2007 survey. The HCC was created when the First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal was signed in 2003. Their mandate is to report publicly on the progress of health care renewal in Canada. One of the Council's goals is to provide a system-wide perspective on health care reform to the Canadian public with a particular focus on issues related to accountability and transparency.

    Once the results of the 2006-2007 survey were released, work began on the 2007-2008 questionnaire. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) joined members of the HCC and the project team at Statistics Canada to begin shaping the 2007-2008 survey. The CIHI, which became a co-sponsor with the HCC, is an independent, national, not-for-profit organization working to improve the health of Canadians and the health care system by providing quality, reliable and timely health information. The research information they produce focuses on health care services, health spending and human resources working in the health sector, as well as issues surrounding the health of the population.

    The 2007-2008 survey differed from the 2006-2007 version in several ways. Along with some content changes, mostly around barriers to access and use of health care, the survey sample was expanded and a sampling strategy was developed to permit national as well as provincial level estimates of survey results. A new questionnaire was developed and tested with focus groups during the month of January 2008, in four cities across the country. The collection mode was also changed from a paper/pencil survey collected over the telephone in 2006-2007 to a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) application in 2007-2008. Collection began in three Statistics Canada regional offices in April and continued until the end of June 2008.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Table: 53-500-X
    Description:

    This report presents the results of a pilot survey conducted by Statistics Canada to measure the fuel consumption of on-road motor vehicles registered in Canada. This study was carried out in connection with the Canadian Vehicle Survey (CVS) which collects information on road activity such as distance traveled, number of passengers and trip purpose.

    Release date: 2004-10-21
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010940
    Description:

    Data Collection Methodology (DCM) enable the collection of good quality data by providing expert advice and assistance on questionnaire design, methods of evaluation and respondent engagement. DCM assist in the development of client skills, undertake research and lead innovation in data collection methods. This is done in a challenging environment of organisational change and limited resources. This paper will cover 'how DCM do business' with clients and the wider methodological community to achieve our goals.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010992
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was redesigned in 2007 so that it could use the continuous data collection method. Since then, a new sample has been selected every two months, and the data have also been collected over a two-month period. The survey uses two collection techniques: computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI) for the sample drawn from an area frame, and computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) for the sample selected from a telephone list frame. Statistics Canada has recently implemented some data collection initiatives to reduce the response burden and survey costs while maintaining or improving data quality. The new measures include the use of a call management tool in the CATI system and a limit on the number of calls. They help manage telephone calls and limit the number of attempts made to contact a respondent. In addition, with the paradata that became available very recently, reports are now being generated to assist in evaluating and monitoring collection procedures and efficiency in real time. The CCHS has also been selected to implement further collection initiatives in the future. This paper provides a brief description of the survey, explains the advantages of continuous collection and outlines the impact that the new initiatives have had on the survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010993
    Description:

    Until now, years of experience in questionnaire design were required to estimate how long it would take a respondent, on the average, to complete a CATI questionnaire for a new survey. This presentation focuses on a new method which produces interview time estimates for questionnaires at the development stage. The method uses Blaise Audit Trail data and previous surveys. It was developed, tested and verified for accuracy on some large scale surveys.

    First, audit trail data was used to determine the average time previous respondents have taken to answer specific types of questions. These would include questions that require a yes/no answer, scaled questions, "mark all that apply" questions, etc. Second, for any given questionnaire, the paths taken by population sub-groups were mapped to identify the series of questions answered by different types of respondents, and timed to determine what the longest possible interview time would be. Finally, the overall expected time it takes to complete the questionnaire is calculated using estimated proportions of the population expected to answer each question.

    So far, we used paradata to accurately estimate average respondent interview completion times. We note that the method that we developed could also be used to estimate specific respondent interview completion times.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010997
    Description:

    Over the past few years, Statistics Canada has conducted several analytical studies using paradata to learn more about various issues surrounding the data collection process and practices. In particular, these investigations have attempted to better understand how data collection progresses through its cycle, to identify strategic opportunities, to evaluate new collection initiatives and to improve the way the agency conducts and manages its surveys. The main objectives of this paper are to present the main results of these past and ongoing investigations describing Statistics Canada's experiences with regards to paradata. Future research plans that focus on identifying viable operational strategies that could improve efficiency or data quality are also discussed.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010999
    Description:

    The choice of number of call attempts in a telephone survey is an important decision. A large number of call attempts makes the data collection costly and time-consuming; and a small number of attempts decreases the response set from which conclusions are drawn and increases the variance. The decision can also have an effect on the nonresponse bias. In this paper we study the effects of number of call attempts on the nonresponse rate and the nonresponse bias in two surveys conducted by Statistics Sweden: The Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Household Finances (HF).

    By use of paradata we calculate the response rate as a function of the number of call attempts. To estimate the nonresponse bias we use estimates of some register variables, where observations are available for both respondents and nonrespondents. We also calculate estimates of some real survey parameters as functions of varying number of call attempts. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce the current number of call attempts without getting an increased nonresponse bias.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011001
    Description:

    Currently underway, the Québec Population Health Survey (EQSP), for which collection will wrap up in February 2009, provides an opportunity, because of the size of its sample, to assess the impact that sending out introductory letters to respondents has on the response rate in a controlled environment. Since this regional telephone survey is expected to have more than 38,000 respondents, it was possible to use part of its sample for this study without having too great an impact on its overall response rate. In random digit dialling (RDD) surveys such as the EQSP, one of the main challenges in sending out introductory letters is reaching the survey units. Doing so depends largely on our capacity to associate an address with the sample units and on the quality of that information.

    This article describes the controlled study proposed by the Institut de la statistique du Québec to measure the effect that sending out introductory letters to respondents had on the survey's response rate.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800110607
    Description:

    Respondent incentives are increasingly used as a measure of combating falling response rates and resulting risks of nonresponse bias. Nonresponse in panel surveys is particularly problematic, since even low wave-on-wave nonresponse rates can lead to substantial cumulative losses; if nonresponse is differential, this may lead to increasing bias across waves. Although the effects of incentives have been studied extensively in cross-sectional contexts, little is known about cumulative effects across waves of a panel. We provide new evidence about the effects of continued incentive payments on attrition, bias and item nonresponse, using data from a large scale, multi-wave, mixed mode incentive experiment on a UK government panel survey of young people. In this study, incentives significantly reduced attrition, far outweighing negative effects on item response rates in terms of the amount of information collected by the survey per issued case. Incentives had proportionate effects on retention rates across a range of respondent characteristics and as a result did not reduce attrition bias in terms of those characteristics. The effects of incentives on retention rates were larger for unconditional than conditional incentives and larger in postal than telephone mode. Across waves, the effects on attrition decreased somewhat, although the effects on item nonresponse and the lack of effect on bias remained constant. The effects of incentives at later waves appeared to be independent of incentive treatments and mode of data collection at earlier waves.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110423
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey uses two sample frames and two data collection methods. In cycle 2.1, a change was made in sample allocation between the two frames. A study of the collection method effect by Statistics Canada revealed comparability problems between cycles 1.1 and 2.1. In contrast, the Institut de la statistique du Québec took a comprehensive look at the changes, and classified 178 variables as "comparable" or 'non-comparable". It made recommendations to Quebec users concerning chronological and interregional comparisons.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010366
    Description:

    This article describes some of the logistical and operational requirement and procedures employed to perform the clinic component of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0115X
    Description:

    This document provides a comprehensive reference to the information available from the General Social Survey (GSS). It provides a description of the content of each of the 18 GSS cycles (e.g. time use, social support, education, the family), as well as background information, target population and collection methodology. A list of the products and services available from each cycle is also included.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0011X
    Description:

    This overview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) provides information on the purpose, content, methodology and products and services pertaining to SLID. Its HTML, menu-driven format enables users to discover all main elements of the survey in one, easy-to-use document. This publication was designed for survey respondents, users of SLID data, researchers and analysts, and individuals who would like to learn more about the survey.

    The SLID is an important source for income data for Canadian families, households and individuals. Introduced in 1993, SLID provides an added dimension to traditional surveys on labour market activity and income: the changes experienced by individuals and families through time. At the heart of the survey's objectives is the understanding of the economic well-being of Canadians. SLID also provides information on a broad selection of human capital variables, labour force experiences and demographic characteristics such as education, family relationships and household composition. Its breadth of content, combined with a relatively large sample, makes it a unique and valuable dataset.

    With this release, users now have free access to the 202 CANSIM Series tables. Tables are accessible using a PC or Mac via the web browser.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016234
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    With the goal of obtaining a complete enumeration of the Canadian agricultural sector, the 2001 Census of Agriculture has been conducted using several collection methods. Challenges to the traditional drop-off and mail-back of paper questionnaires in a household-based enumeration have led to the adoption of supplemental methods using newer technologies to maintain the coverage and content of the census. Overall, this mixed-mode data collection process responds to the critical needs of the census programme at various points. This paper examines these data collection methods, several quality assessments, and the future challenges of obtaining a co-ordinated view of the methods' individual approaches to achieving data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000013
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the new entry exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview.

    Release date: 2001-04-17
Date modified: