Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

44 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (22)

All (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Public use microdata: 89-555-X2013002
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) provides data on three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE). Data are based on interviews with approximately 27,000 respondents, which allows for reliable estimation at the national, provincial and territorial level.

    The file provides information about the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills for the Canadian population aged 16 to 65. It provides results for Canada as a whole, as well as for all the provinces and territories. In addition, it provides skills proficiency information and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, level of education) across the entire Canadian population. It also provides information on the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills of Aboriginal populations, immigrants, and official-language minority communities.

    Release date: 2013-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-555-X2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents the first Canadian results of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), an initiative of OECD. PIAAC provides internationally comparable measures of three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE).

    Canada is one of 24 countries and sub-national regions participating in this initiative. A sample of over 27,000 respondents was collected and allows reliable estimation at the national, provincial and territorial level.

    The report provides information about the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills for the Canadian population aged 16 to 65. It provides results for Canada as a whole, as well as for all the provinces and territories. In addition, it looks at the relationships between skills proficiency and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, level of education) across the entire Canadian population. It also reports on first results on the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills of Aboriginal populations, immigrants, and official-language minority communities.

    Release date: 2013-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents information on the integration of information and communications technologies (ICT) in elementary and secondary school classrooms. It uses data from the 2003 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines how people learned their computer skills and which methods they found most important.

    Release date: 2002-03-11
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Public use microdata: 89-555-X2013002
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) provides data on three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE). Data are based on interviews with approximately 27,000 respondents, which allows for reliable estimation at the national, provincial and territorial level.

    The file provides information about the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills for the Canadian population aged 16 to 65. It provides results for Canada as a whole, as well as for all the provinces and territories. In addition, it provides skills proficiency information and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, level of education) across the entire Canadian population. It also provides information on the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills of Aboriginal populations, immigrants, and official-language minority communities.

    Release date: 2013-10-18

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29
Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-555-X2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents the first Canadian results of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), an initiative of OECD. PIAAC provides internationally comparable measures of three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE).

    Canada is one of 24 countries and sub-national regions participating in this initiative. A sample of over 27,000 respondents was collected and allows reliable estimation at the national, provincial and territorial level.

    The report provides information about the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills for the Canadian population aged 16 to 65. It provides results for Canada as a whole, as well as for all the provinces and territories. In addition, it looks at the relationships between skills proficiency and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, level of education) across the entire Canadian population. It also reports on first results on the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills of Aboriginal populations, immigrants, and official-language minority communities.

    Release date: 2013-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents information on the integration of information and communications technologies (ICT) in elementary and secondary school classrooms. It uses data from the 2003 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines how people learned their computer skills and which methods they found most important.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • 10. Older surfers Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores Internet use among Canadians aged 60 and over, specifically, why and how they use it, and how they developed their computer skills. It also examines barriers to use.

    Release date: 2001-12-11
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: