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  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016243
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Since 1996, the Census Bureau has been creating Web Computerized Self-Administered Questionnaires (CSAQs). These electronic questionnaires have some data quality advantages over paper questionnaires such as the availability of online help; pre-loaded data; the use of interactive edits (which allows respondents to correct their responses as they are entered); and, for establishment surveys, the ability to import data from spreadsheets. This paper provides an overview of the Census Bureau's Web CSAQs. Each of the Web CSAQ design features promoting data quality are explained, as well as the features that impose data quality obstacles. Finally, some recent, empirical, data quality results from both establishment and household surveys are presented.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035762
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The first survey of innovation, advanced technologies and practices in the Canadian construction sector was recently conducted. Of the five types of technologies listed in the survey, communications technologies have the highest percentage of use (46% of businesses). Of all the techonolgies, three computer-related technologies had the highest percentage of use : e-mail (38%), company computer networks (25%) and computer aided design (23%). The three advanced practices with the largest percentage of business using them, each with one third of businesses, are: design-build contracts, computerized inventory control and computerized estimating software.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998119
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in both countries generally place quite similar emphases on items in the list of benefits received and problems that have impeded adoption, there are significant differences that arise because of the smaller size of the Canadian market.

    Release date: 1999-04-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-522-X
    Description:

    The framework described here is intended as a basic operational instrument for systematic development of statistical information respecting the evolution of science and technology and its interactions with the society, the economy and the political system of which it is a part.

    Release date: 1999-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the determinants of the adoption lag for advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses plant-level data collected on the length of the adoption lag (the time between a firm's first becoming aware of a new technology and its adoption of the technology) to examine the extent to which the adoption lag is a function of the benefits and costs associated with technology adoption as well as certain plant characteristics that are proxies for a plant's receptor capabilities.

    Economic theory suggests that the diffusion of advanced technologies should be a function of the benefits associated with the adoption of new technologies. Other studies have had to proxy the benefits with environmental characteristics-like proximity to markets, fertility of soils, size of firm. This paper makes use of more direct evidence collected from the 1993 Survey of Innovation and Advanced Technology concerning firms' own evaluations of the benefits and costs of adoption along with measures of overall technological competency. Both are found to be highly significant determinants of the adoption lag. Geographical nearness of suppliers decreases the adoption lag. Variables that have been previously used to proxy the benefits associated with technology adoption-variables such as larger firm size, younger age, and more diversification by the parent firm also decrease the adoption lag-but they have much less effect than the direct measure of benefits and firm competency.

    Release date: 1998-08-31
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Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016243
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Since 1996, the Census Bureau has been creating Web Computerized Self-Administered Questionnaires (CSAQs). These electronic questionnaires have some data quality advantages over paper questionnaires such as the availability of online help; pre-loaded data; the use of interactive edits (which allows respondents to correct their responses as they are entered); and, for establishment surveys, the ability to import data from spreadsheets. This paper provides an overview of the Census Bureau's Web CSAQs. Each of the Web CSAQ design features promoting data quality are explained, as well as the features that impose data quality obstacles. Finally, some recent, empirical, data quality results from both establishment and household surveys are presented.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035762
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The first survey of innovation, advanced technologies and practices in the Canadian construction sector was recently conducted. Of the five types of technologies listed in the survey, communications technologies have the highest percentage of use (46% of businesses). Of all the techonolgies, three computer-related technologies had the highest percentage of use : e-mail (38%), company computer networks (25%) and computer aided design (23%). The three advanced practices with the largest percentage of business using them, each with one third of businesses, are: design-build contracts, computerized inventory control and computerized estimating software.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998119
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in both countries generally place quite similar emphases on items in the list of benefits received and problems that have impeded adoption, there are significant differences that arise because of the smaller size of the Canadian market.

    Release date: 1999-04-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-522-X
    Description:

    The framework described here is intended as a basic operational instrument for systematic development of statistical information respecting the evolution of science and technology and its interactions with the society, the economy and the political system of which it is a part.

    Release date: 1999-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the determinants of the adoption lag for advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses plant-level data collected on the length of the adoption lag (the time between a firm's first becoming aware of a new technology and its adoption of the technology) to examine the extent to which the adoption lag is a function of the benefits and costs associated with technology adoption as well as certain plant characteristics that are proxies for a plant's receptor capabilities.

    Economic theory suggests that the diffusion of advanced technologies should be a function of the benefits associated with the adoption of new technologies. Other studies have had to proxy the benefits with environmental characteristics-like proximity to markets, fertility of soils, size of firm. This paper makes use of more direct evidence collected from the 1993 Survey of Innovation and Advanced Technology concerning firms' own evaluations of the benefits and costs of adoption along with measures of overall technological competency. Both are found to be highly significant determinants of the adoption lag. Geographical nearness of suppliers decreases the adoption lag. Variables that have been previously used to proxy the benefits associated with technology adoption-variables such as larger firm size, younger age, and more diversification by the parent firm also decrease the adoption lag-but they have much less effect than the direct measure of benefits and firm competency.

    Release date: 1998-08-31
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