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All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Profile of a community or region: 46-26-0001
    Description:

    The Open Database of Addresses (ODA) is a listing of address points across Canada. The database contains addresses and geo coordinates. The ODA is based on data from authoritative sources that include among them provincial, territorial and municipal governments. The ODA is released as open data under the Open Government License - Canada and provided as a collection of compressed CSV files.

    Release date: 2021-04-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-015-X
    Description:

    This report contains descriptive analysis of the size, scope and nature of Canada's nonprofit sector in economic terms, statistical tables and information on the concepts, and data sources and methods used to compile the estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • 4. Métis Children Archived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 5. Inuit Children Archived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210552
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, this article compares rates of community belonging at the provincial or territorial and health region levels. Associations between community belonging and mental and general health are examined.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2008088
    Description:

    The results of this research show that exposure to global restructuring trends increases community vulnerability to population and employment decline. Similarly, other condititions of community distress, such as high unemployment rates and low participation rates, increase the vulnerability to decline. Community assets, such as human capital, economic diversification, and proximity to agglomerations, reduce vulnerability to population and employment decline.

    Release date: 2008-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Profile of a community or region: 46-26-0001
    Description:

    The Open Database of Addresses (ODA) is a listing of address points across Canada. The database contains addresses and geo coordinates. The ODA is based on data from authoritative sources that include among them provincial, territorial and municipal governments. The ODA is released as open data under the Open Government License - Canada and provided as a collection of compressed CSV files.

    Release date: 2021-04-29

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-015-X
    Description:

    This report contains descriptive analysis of the size, scope and nature of Canada's nonprofit sector in economic terms, statistical tables and information on the concepts, and data sources and methods used to compile the estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • 3. Métis Children Archived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 4. Inuit Children Archived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210552
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, this article compares rates of community belonging at the provincial or territorial and health region levels. Associations between community belonging and mental and general health are examined.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2008088
    Description:

    The results of this research show that exposure to global restructuring trends increases community vulnerability to population and employment decline. Similarly, other condititions of community distress, such as high unemployment rates and low participation rates, increase the vulnerability to decline. Community assets, such as human capital, economic diversification, and proximity to agglomerations, reduce vulnerability to population and employment decline.

    Release date: 2008-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-533-X
    Description:

    This publication provides the first national portrait of the many thousands of nonprofit and voluntary organizations found in every Canadian community. The data, from the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, reveal a set of organizations that are widely diverse in nature, touching virtually every aspect of Canadians' lives.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin uses General Social Survey (GSS), cycle 17 data to examine various aspects of social engagement, social cohesion and social participation.

    Release date: 2005-06-21
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