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All (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2018013
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a portrait of young Canadians aged 25 to 29 years old, who were not in education, employment or training (NEET) in 2017/2018. It explores in-depth gender-based differences, the effect of these young Canadians’ highest level of education, as well as the impact of children in households. It also gives international and interprovincial comparisons.

    Release date: 2018-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154969
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population to examine changes between 2005 and 2015 in the work activity patterns of Canadian families with children. Results by education level and by immigration status are discussed, as well as results for lone parent families. The paper also provides an overview of regional differences in the work activity patterns of Canadian families.

    Release date: 2018-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Table: 98-312-X2011020
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    ©This data includes information copied with permission from Canada Post Corporation.

    Release date: 2013-02-05

  • Table: 98-312-X2011017
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011018
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011032
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011033
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011019
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19
Data (27)

Data (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Table: 98-312-X2011020
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    ©This data includes information copied with permission from Canada Post Corporation.

    Release date: 2013-02-05

  • Table: 98-312-X2011017
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011018
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011032
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011033
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011019
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X2011021
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X2011034
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X2011035
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19
Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2018013
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a portrait of young Canadians aged 25 to 29 years old, who were not in education, employment or training (NEET) in 2017/2018. It explores in-depth gender-based differences, the effect of these young Canadians’ highest level of education, as well as the impact of children in households. It also gives international and interprovincial comparisons.

    Release date: 2018-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154969
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population to examine changes between 2005 and 2015 in the work activity patterns of Canadian families with children. Results by education level and by immigration status are discussed, as well as results for lone parent families. The paper also provides an overview of regional differences in the work activity patterns of Canadian families.

    Release date: 2018-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111511
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This article examines the age and sex structure within Canada's provinces and territories as of July 1st, 2010. As population aging is observed, a few themes are discussed: the senior population continues to grow, the population of older working-age increases and the share of children decreases. The author also examines the provincial and territorial variations of aging within Canada.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210918
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the increasing prevalence of the proportion of mothers aged 40 to 44 with a pre-school aged child (0 to 4 years of age) over the past 20 years. It also presents a socio-economic profile of these mothers, in particular their education levels, occupations and place of birth.

    Release date: 2009-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110784
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the number of children and families touched by services of the five Maintenance Enforcement Programs currently reporting to the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs (SMEP). Maintenance Enforcement Programs (MEPs) were created to provide assistance to payors and recipients of child and spousal support, and to improve compliance with support payments primarily for the benefit of the children implicated in the parental break up. Also discussed is the amount of support due to families owed child support, the proportion of these families actually receiving support, and the enforcement response by MEPs when payors default on their child support payments. The final section touches on reciprocating enforcement for interprovincial or international cases that involve two MEPs or child support agencies.

    Information is collected through the SMEP. This survey gathers information on the caseload of the MEP, the sex and median age of payors, recipients and children, typical support amounts, compliance rates, information on arrears, frequency and amount of payments, legislation under which the order for support was made, and types of actions that are initiated in order to enforce support.

    This report contains data from Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Alberta, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. In future years, with more provinces and territories able to report to the SMEP, a more complete national picture of maintenance enforcement will emerge.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610913171
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From 1995 to 2004, the proportion of women and men aged 25 to 54 in the labour force grew steadily. However, from 2004 into the first half of 2006, both women's and men's participation rates declined very slightly yet persistently. Is this the beginning of a new trend or does it merely reflect regular fluctuations in the economy? Particular attention is focused on women with young children.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200600613003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examine patterns in adult children returning to the family home across the last few decades, the reasons for coming back, and the socio-demographic and economic factors that influence this process.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30
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