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  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019013
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines participation in early learning and child care for young children in Canada. Child care is an important economic contributor for families since provision of non-parental child care is a necessity for some parents to engage in the labour market. In addition, child care offers opportunities for child development and socialization.

    Release date: 2019-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • 89C0042
    Description:

    The Survey of Young Canadians provides nationally representative indicators on child development.

    The objectives of the Survey of Young Canadians are: to determine the prevalence of various risk and protective factors for children; to provide information on child development (such as cognitive, emotional and behavioural development); to make this information available for developing policies and programs that will help children; and to collect information about the environment in which the child is growing up--family, peers, school, and community.

    Release date: 2012-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010962
    Description:

    The ÉLDEQ initiated a special data gathering project in March 2008 with the collection of biological materials from 1,973 families. During a typical visit, a nurse collects a blood or saliva sample from the selected child, makes a series of measurements (anthropometry, pulse rate and blood pressure) and administers questionnaires. Planned and supervised by the Institut de la Statistique du Québec (ISQ) and the Université de Montréal, the study is being conducted in cooperation with two private firms and a number of hospitals. This article examines the choice of collection methods, the division of effort among the various players, the sequence of communications and contacts with respondents, the tracing of families who are not contacted, and follow-up on the biological samples. Preliminary field results are also presented.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900310921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study identifies, in a representative sample of Canadian children, age-related patterns of overweight and obesity between toddlerhood and childhood. The data are from cycles 2 through 5 (1996/1997 to 2002/2003) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The sample comprised children aged 24 to 35 months at baseline, who were followed biennially over six years.

    Release date: 2009-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210871
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines longitudinal relationships between body weight and self-esteem in a nationally representative probability sample of Canadian children. The data are from cycles 1, 2 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110524
    Description:

    Growth curves are used by health professionals to determine whether the growth of a child or a foetus, for example, is within normal limits. The growth charts currently used in Canada for height, weight and body mass index (BMI) are based on US data. Child growth curves can now be generated from the latest available data in Canada. One way of estimating and drawing growth curves is the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) method. The method has been used in various studies by the World Health Organization, the United Kingdom and the United States to generate reference growth curves for children. In this article, the LMS method is used to estimate growth curves in BMI percentiles from weighted cross-sectional data provided by cycle 2.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey. This article is about the child BMI, one of the anthropometric measures most commonly used to assess growth and obesity.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Table: 82-570-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This is the second version of the Statistical report on the health of Canadians. Like the original in 1996, this report provides a comprehensive and detailed statistical overview of the health status of Canadians and the major determinants of that status. The original report was created for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Advisory Committee on Population Health, which has also commissioned this update. The broad purpose of the report is to help policy-makers and program planners identify priority issues and measure progress in the domain of population health.

    The Statistical report is meant to be a tool for learning as well as planning. The data identify populations at risk; suggest associations between health determinants, health status, and population characteristics; raise questions about the reasons for the widespread differences among the provinces and territories; and illustrate areas where Canada's health information system is robust, and others where it is relatively weak. These and other themes are touched on in the 11 section introductions of the Statistical Report and developed more fully in the companion publication, Toward a healthy future: second report on the health of Canadians. These publications are available at the Health Canada web site at: http://www.hc-sc.ca.

    Release date: 1999-09-16
Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019013
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines participation in early learning and child care for young children in Canada. Child care is an important economic contributor for families since provision of non-parental child care is a necessity for some parents to engage in the labour market. In addition, child care offers opportunities for child development and socialization.

    Release date: 2019-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010962
    Description:

    The ÉLDEQ initiated a special data gathering project in March 2008 with the collection of biological materials from 1,973 families. During a typical visit, a nurse collects a blood or saliva sample from the selected child, makes a series of measurements (anthropometry, pulse rate and blood pressure) and administers questionnaires. Planned and supervised by the Institut de la Statistique du Québec (ISQ) and the Université de Montréal, the study is being conducted in cooperation with two private firms and a number of hospitals. This article examines the choice of collection methods, the division of effort among the various players, the sequence of communications and contacts with respondents, the tracing of families who are not contacted, and follow-up on the biological samples. Preliminary field results are also presented.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900310921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study identifies, in a representative sample of Canadian children, age-related patterns of overweight and obesity between toddlerhood and childhood. The data are from cycles 2 through 5 (1996/1997 to 2002/2003) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The sample comprised children aged 24 to 35 months at baseline, who were followed biennially over six years.

    Release date: 2009-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210871
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines longitudinal relationships between body weight and self-esteem in a nationally representative probability sample of Canadian children. The data are from cycles 1, 2 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110524
    Description:

    Growth curves are used by health professionals to determine whether the growth of a child or a foetus, for example, is within normal limits. The growth charts currently used in Canada for height, weight and body mass index (BMI) are based on US data. Child growth curves can now be generated from the latest available data in Canada. One way of estimating and drawing growth curves is the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) method. The method has been used in various studies by the World Health Organization, the United Kingdom and the United States to generate reference growth curves for children. In this article, the LMS method is used to estimate growth curves in BMI percentiles from weighted cross-sectional data provided by cycle 2.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey. This article is about the child BMI, one of the anthropometric measures most commonly used to assess growth and obesity.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006284
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

    Release date: 2006-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006281
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper examines whether various measures of family income are associated with the cognitive, social/emotional, physical and behavioural development of children. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to assess a range of measures of well-being among children aged 4-15 in 1998, whose family composition remained unchanged between 1994 and 1998. The study finds that regardless of age or how income is measured, higher family income is almost always associated with better child well-being. Among children in lower income families, incremental increases in household income are found to be associated with better child development outcomes. Increases in income continue to remain associated with better well-being, even once children are out of low income. In fact, the study does not find a point above which high income ceases to benefit children's development. In particular, children's cognitive and behavioural development measures appear to have the strongest associations with levels of family income.

    The results show that changes in family income appear to be less important for child outcomes than levels of family income for 8-11- and 12-15-year-olds. However, for the 4-7-year-old group, changes in family income are more important ' particularly for emotional development scores. Analysis from the Youth in Transition Survey also finds similar relationships between the socio-economic status of the family and the developmental outcomes of children.

    Release date: 2006-05-11
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0015G
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term research program (started in 1994) that will track a large sample of children over many years, enabling researchers to monitor children's well-being and development.

    Not all the information collected for the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth are included in this first microdata file. The second release will be in 1997.

    Release date: 1996-12-18
Date modified: