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  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016002
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the settlement patterns of the immigrant population as well as certain social integration components. It starts by outlining recent trends in the settlement patterns of the immigrant population in Canadian census metropolitan areas, namely Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. Based on data from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity, it then looks at residence characteristics, such as type of municipality and concentration of immigrant population, according to four social integration components: personal network characteristics, relationships with neighbours, social participation and involvement in community activities, and sense of belonging.

    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-168-X
    Description:

    The Census Tract Boundary Files portray the census tract boundaries for which Census data are disseminated. Census tracts are small, relatively stable geographic areas that usually have a population of 2,500 to 8,000. They are located in census metropolitan areas and in census agglomerations with an urban core population of 50,000 or more in the previous census. The files contain the boundaries of all census tracts located within census metropolitan areas and those census agglomerations which are part of the Census Tract Program.

    There are two types of boundary files: digital and cartographic. Digital files depict the full extent of the geographical areas, including the coastal water area. Cartographic files depict the geographical areas using only the major land mass of Canada and its coastal islands. The files provide a framework for mapping and spatial analysis using commercially available geographic information systems (GIS) or other mapping software.

    The Census Tract Boundary Files are portrayed in Lambert conformal conic projection and are based on the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). A reference guide is available (92-160-GWE).

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Profile of a community or region: 98-314-X2011054
    Description:

    Using 2011 Census data, this profile provides a statistical overview of the age and sex as well as families, households, marital status, structural type of dwelling and collectives and language characteristics for census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. In the census product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the census cycle, starting with age and sex. Together, they will form a complete Census Profile of all the variables for each level of geography, plus one cumulative profile for the dissolved census subdivisions. Starting with the age and sex major day of release, and on major days of release thereafter, profile component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, economic region, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area, census agglomeration, population centre, and census tract levels, designated places, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2013 Representation Order) level. Profile component data for all other standard geographic areas, including dissemination areas, dissolved census subdivisions, and forward sortation areas, will be available after the major days of release.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Profile of a community or region: 99-014-X2011019
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration, income and earnings, and housing and shelter costs.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Profile of a community or region: 99-012-X2011019
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Table: 98-312-X2011018
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011022
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011025
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011029
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21
Data (42)

Data (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Profile of a community or region: 98-314-X2011054
    Description:

    Using 2011 Census data, this profile provides a statistical overview of the age and sex as well as families, households, marital status, structural type of dwelling and collectives and language characteristics for census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. In the census product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the census cycle, starting with age and sex. Together, they will form a complete Census Profile of all the variables for each level of geography, plus one cumulative profile for the dissolved census subdivisions. Starting with the age and sex major day of release, and on major days of release thereafter, profile component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, economic region, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area, census agglomeration, population centre, and census tract levels, designated places, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2013 Representation Order) level. Profile component data for all other standard geographic areas, including dissemination areas, dissolved census subdivisions, and forward sortation areas, will be available after the major days of release.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

  • Profile of a community or region: 99-014-X2011019
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration, income and earnings, and housing and shelter costs.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Profile of a community or region: 99-012-X2011019
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Table: 98-312-X2011018
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011022
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011025
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011029
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011033
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-312-X2011040
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Table: 98-313-X2011021
    Description:

    This topic presents the count of collective dwellings by type, and the age and sex of people living in collective dwellings. Information is also available on the structural type of private dwellings.

    Release date: 2012-11-21
Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016002
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the settlement patterns of the immigrant population as well as certain social integration components. It starts by outlining recent trends in the settlement patterns of the immigrant population in Canadian census metropolitan areas, namely Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. Based on data from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity, it then looks at residence characteristics, such as type of municipality and concentration of immigrant population, according to four social integration components: personal network characteristics, relationships with neighbours, social participation and involvement in community activities, and sense of belonging.

    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111116
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study looks at child and spousal support, and government enforcement of that support, in different neighbourhoods (Census Tracts, CTs) in the census metropolitan areas from reporting jurisdictions (Halifax, Saint John, Moncton, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary and Edmonton). CTs are grouped into income quintiles; comparisons are made between lower and higher income CTs on a variety of indicators.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at the distribution of recent immigrants in census metropolitan areas (CMAs), implications on public services in urban areas and the employment characteristics of immigrants.

    Release date: 2004-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Geography: Canada, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1997012
    Description:

    This paper presents data collected from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary interview on a person's work experience: years of full-time work, part-time work and no work. It uses these data to study the effect of Labour market intermittency (or time not in a full-time job) on current employment earnings.

    Release date: 1997-12-31
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-168-X
    Description:

    The Census Tract Boundary Files portray the census tract boundaries for which Census data are disseminated. Census tracts are small, relatively stable geographic areas that usually have a population of 2,500 to 8,000. They are located in census metropolitan areas and in census agglomerations with an urban core population of 50,000 or more in the previous census. The files contain the boundaries of all census tracts located within census metropolitan areas and those census agglomerations which are part of the Census Tract Program.

    There are two types of boundary files: digital and cartographic. Digital files depict the full extent of the geographical areas, including the coastal water area. Cartographic files depict the geographical areas using only the major land mass of Canada and its coastal islands. The files provide a framework for mapping and spatial analysis using commercially available geographic information systems (GIS) or other mapping software.

    The Census Tract Boundary Files are portrayed in Lambert conformal conic projection and are based on the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). A reference guide is available (92-160-GWE).

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-147-X
    Description:

    The Dissemination Area Reference Maps, by Census Tract, for Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations cover all census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations that are part of the census tract program. Each map in the series covers one census tract and displays the boundaries and unique identifiers of dissemination areas within a census tract. Inset maps are available to show detail for the more concentrated areas. The maps display census tract, census subdivision, and census metropolitan area or census agglomeration boundaries along with street network and other visible features such as railroads, rivers and lakes.

    Dissemination area reference maps are also available for non-tracted census agglomerations (92-148-X), and by census subdivisions for areas outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (92-145-X). Together, the three sets of dissemination area maps cover all of Canada.

    A reference guide is available (92-143-G).

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-146-G
    Description:

    The Census Tract Reference Maps, by Census Metropolitan Areas or Census Agglomerations, Reference Guide describes the content and general methodology, as well as data quality, and other information.

    Release date: 2007-01-16

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0145G
    Description:

    The Census Tract Reference Maps Reference Guide is available for the following products: Census Tract Reference Maps, by Census Metropolitan Area or Census Agglomeration, 2001 Census (Catalogue Nos. 92F0145XIB, 92F0145XCB and 92F0145XPB). The Reference Guide describes the content and applications of these products, as well as data quality, record layouts, and other information.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0145X
    Description:

    The series of Census Tract Reference Maps covers all 27 census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and the 19 census agglomerations (CAs) with census tracts. There are 73 maps in the series, with one to four maps covering each CMA or CA. The maps show the boundaries and names of census tracts and census subdivisions, as well as the urban core, urban fringe and rural fringe within the CMAs or CAs. The maps include background information such as rivers, lakes, railroad tracks and provincial boundaries, and other significant features. The map scales range from 1:25,000 to 1:2,000,000, and the maximum map dimensions are approximately 91 cm by 101 cm (36 inches by 40 inches). A reference guide is available (Catalogue No. 92F0145GIE).

    For the 2001 Census, reference maps are available free on the Internet (www.statcan.gc.ca), or they can be purchased through the nearest Regional Reference Centre in electronic format (PDF on CD-ROM) or paper format.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0171G
    Description:

    The Cartographic Boundary Files Reference Guide is available for the following products:

    - Provinces and Territories Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0160XCE).- Census Divisions and Economic Regions Cartographic Boundary Files (Catalogue No. 92F0161XCE)- Census Subdivisions Cartographic Boundary Files (Catalogue No. 92F0162XCE)- Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order) Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0163XCE)- Urban Areas Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0164XCE)- Designated Places Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0165XCE)- Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0166XCE)- Census Consolidated Subdivisions Cartographic Boundary File (Catalogue No. 92F0167XCE)- Census Tracts Cartographic Boundary Files (Catalogue No. 92F0168XCE)- Dissemination Areas Cartographic Boundary Files (Catalogue No. 92F0169XCE)

    The Reference Guide describes the content and applications of these products, as well as data quality, record layouts, and other information.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0138M2002001
    Description:

    The 2001 Census defines 27 census metropolitan area (CMAs) and 19 census agglomerations (CAs) with census tracts. This working paper includes three maps for each of these CMAs and CAs. The first map shows the boundary of the CMA/CA and the boundaries of the census subdivision (CSD) components of the CMA/CA for the 1996 Census. The second map shows the transition from 1996 to 2001 (with boundary changes highlighted), and the third map shows the CMA/CA (and component CSDs) as it is defined for the 2001 Census. Accompanying tables list the component census subdivisions and the criteria which they meet to be included in the CMA or CA. The paper describes various factors that can result in changes to the boundaries of CMAs and CAs. For the 2001 Census, municipal restructuring is the factor that has had the greatest impact on the boundaries of some CMAs and CAs.The paper also briefly describes and compares the delineation criteria for metropolitan areas in the United States with those for census metropolitan areas in Canada. An indication is given of the impact on the Canadian CMA program if the American metropolitan area criteria were used.

    Release date: 2002-03-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-371-X
    Description:

    This report deals with sampling and weighting, a process whereby certain characteristics are collected and processed for a random sample of dwellings and persons identified in the complete census enumeration. Data for the whole population are then obtained by scaling up the results for the sample to the full population level. The use of sampling may lead to substantial reductions in costs and respondent burden, or alternatively, can allow the scope of a census to be broadened at the same cost.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Notices and consultations: 92-125-S
    Description:

    This Geography Supplement augments the Geography section of the 2001 Census Consultation Guide, Catalogue No. 92-125-GPE. It provides additional information to help users contribute ideas and suggestions to Statistics Canada regarding the geographic content of the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 1997-07-24
Date modified: