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  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009320
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do students know the education required to achieve their career objectives? Is this information related to their education pathways? To address these questions, the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), Cohort A is used to compare high school students' perceptions of the level of education they will require for the job they intend to hold at age 30, with the level required according to professional job analysts at Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The focus is on students intending to work in a job which requires a university degree, and examine the correlation between the knowledge of educational requirements and subsequent university enrolment. The results suggest that about three out of four students intending to work in a job requiring a university degree are aware of the education they will require. Evidence suggests that knowledge of educational requirements is related to academic performance and socio-economic background. Differences by intended occupation are quite small. Moreover, students who know that a university degree is required are more likely to attend university, even after accounting for differences in academic performance, sex, and socioeconomic background. In fact, the knowledge of educational requirements is as strongly related to university attendance as other well-documented correlates such as sex, academic performance and parental education. Finally, higher university attendance rates are observed when students learn earlier (rather than later), that a university degree is required for their intended job.

    Release date: 2009-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12F0053X
    Description:

    This brochure is intended for anyone interested in a career as a mathematical statistician at Statistics Canada (MA group). It provides an overview of Statistics Canada and the workplace, a description of the type of work done by statisticians, as well as the training and development available to statisticians. It also gives the requirements and a description of the process involved in the annual recruitment of the statisticians (MA group), including the deadline dates for the different steps. Finally, it lists the name, address and phone number of the person in charge of the annual recruitment for the MA program for the given year.

    Release date: 2002-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population is a well recognized phenomenon and has received considerable policy research attention, particularly in the health and public pension domains. Very little work has been focused on the impacts of aging at the organizational level. Foot and Venne studied the advancement of the baby boom through traditional organizational hierarchies, noting its impacts on human resource policies that encourage horizontal career development. Saba et al looked more particularly at the management of older professionals in the Quebec public service, finding that employee recognition was an important human resource strategy for motivating this group. We extend these studies further along the aging ladder -- to the point where retirement and replacement become the major concerns.

    Looking at the management hierarchy within Statistics Canada, we use a microsimulation model first to estimate the expected level of retirements over the next 10 years. We then detail the adjustments to promotion and hiring rates required to replace outgoing managers. We then examine simulated microdata to estimate the experience effects of increasing turnover. Finally, we use the demographic features of the model to examine whether the increasing turnover is likely to increase the representation of women and visible minorities among Statistics Canada managers.

    Given the assumptions outlined in the paper, we find that increasing turnover rates in the next 10 years will generally not reduce management experience to below recently observed levels. We also find that given equal promotion rates for men and women, the representation rate of women among Statistics Canada managers is likely to increase rapidly in coming years. On the other hand, visible minority representation among managers will likely stall for several years, even with proactive recruitment and advancement policies.

    Release date: 2002-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12F0073X
    Description:

    This publication is intended for anyone interested in a career as an economist/sociologist at Statistics Canada, Canada's federal statistical agency.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12
Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009320
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Do students know the education required to achieve their career objectives? Is this information related to their education pathways? To address these questions, the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), Cohort A is used to compare high school students' perceptions of the level of education they will require for the job they intend to hold at age 30, with the level required according to professional job analysts at Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The focus is on students intending to work in a job which requires a university degree, and examine the correlation between the knowledge of educational requirements and subsequent university enrolment. The results suggest that about three out of four students intending to work in a job requiring a university degree are aware of the education they will require. Evidence suggests that knowledge of educational requirements is related to academic performance and socio-economic background. Differences by intended occupation are quite small. Moreover, students who know that a university degree is required are more likely to attend university, even after accounting for differences in academic performance, sex, and socioeconomic background. In fact, the knowledge of educational requirements is as strongly related to university attendance as other well-documented correlates such as sex, academic performance and parental education. Finally, higher university attendance rates are observed when students learn earlier (rather than later), that a university degree is required for their intended job.

    Release date: 2009-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population is a well recognized phenomenon and has received considerable policy research attention, particularly in the health and public pension domains. Very little work has been focused on the impacts of aging at the organizational level. Foot and Venne studied the advancement of the baby boom through traditional organizational hierarchies, noting its impacts on human resource policies that encourage horizontal career development. Saba et al looked more particularly at the management of older professionals in the Quebec public service, finding that employee recognition was an important human resource strategy for motivating this group. We extend these studies further along the aging ladder -- to the point where retirement and replacement become the major concerns.

    Looking at the management hierarchy within Statistics Canada, we use a microsimulation model first to estimate the expected level of retirements over the next 10 years. We then detail the adjustments to promotion and hiring rates required to replace outgoing managers. We then examine simulated microdata to estimate the experience effects of increasing turnover. Finally, we use the demographic features of the model to examine whether the increasing turnover is likely to increase the representation of women and visible minorities among Statistics Canada managers.

    Given the assumptions outlined in the paper, we find that increasing turnover rates in the next 10 years will generally not reduce management experience to below recently observed levels. We also find that given equal promotion rates for men and women, the representation rate of women among Statistics Canada managers is likely to increase rapidly in coming years. On the other hand, visible minority representation among managers will likely stall for several years, even with proactive recruitment and advancement policies.

    Release date: 2002-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • 7. Stateward bound Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044912
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a group of Canadian postsecondary graduates who relocated to the United States.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014576
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at methods used in finding a job after graduation and the criteria for choosing a job.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0096X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report 'Employee training: an international perspective', the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. The report provides new insights into training issues in seven countries: Canada, the United States, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Poland, Germany and Sweden. The study examines full-time paid workers between the ages of 25 and 60, who had been employed for at least 42 weeks in the 12 months preceding the survey (about nine months in the previous year). (Although the self-employed account for a growing share of the work force, they are not included in the analysis.)

    Release date: 1997-12-16
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12F0053X
    Description:

    This brochure is intended for anyone interested in a career as a mathematical statistician at Statistics Canada (MA group). It provides an overview of Statistics Canada and the workplace, a description of the type of work done by statisticians, as well as the training and development available to statisticians. It also gives the requirements and a description of the process involved in the annual recruitment of the statisticians (MA group), including the deadline dates for the different steps. Finally, it lists the name, address and phone number of the person in charge of the annual recruitment for the MA program for the given year.

    Release date: 2002-09-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12F0073X
    Description:

    This publication is intended for anyone interested in a career as an economist/sociologist at Statistics Canada, Canada's federal statistical agency.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11
Date modified: