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  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100054
    Description:

    This article provides insights into how COVID-19 could potentially impact commercial and industrial machinery and equipment rental and leasing industry. This article also provides estimates for 2020 index values using past economic impacts as benchmarks.

    Release date: 2020-07-24

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    This classification system is used for organizing economic data by industry, and is used by Canada, Mexico and the United States. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 version 3.0 supersedes NAICS 2017 Version 2.0. NAICS is revised on a five-year cycle in order to ensure that the classification continues to reflect the changing structure of the economy. NAICS Canada 2017 version 3.0 groups economic activity into 20 sectors and 928 Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2018-09-20

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Table: 63-224-X
    Description:

    The handbook is designed to be a comprehensive source of socio-economic statistics for all those who study the Canadian consumer market - market researchers, strategists, product planners and sales leaders. The broad range of data is equally relevant to consumer and to business-to-business marketing. The data present profiles of key industries, including the small business sector, as well as of consumers in all the provinces and the 45 major cities across Canada. International trade data, households, families and selected economic indicators, to name a few, provide useful information for businesses seeking to expand or develop new product lines. As well as including data from the 2001 Census and a wide range of other surveys, the 2006 edition also incorporates a number of features designed to make it more user-friendly. Features include a user's guide, annotated charts to reveal salient trends, data sources, and references to CANSIM.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007001
    Description:

    This study examines the factors that explain export orientation among Canadian Knowledge-Intensive Business Services (KIBS) firms, particularly innovativeness, while controlling for foreign control, size of establishment, training level of workforce, use of intellectual property protection and industry type. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2007-04-03

  • Table: 67-203-X
    Description:

    This comprehensive source on international service transactions contains aggregate and detailed breakouts by type of service each year since 1989. Major categories are travel, transportation, commercial and government services. Commercial services, comprising a range of business and professional services are categorized by geographical area (United States, European Union and all other countries), industry, country of control (Canada, United States, other) and whether or not the service was with foreign affiliated companies; these details are presented from 1996.

    New with the 1999 issue are annual breakdowns from 1991 of total services for 8 additional countries beyond the 47 already published. Each country is broken down into the following categories: travel, transportation, commercial and government services. For Canada as a whole, quarterly data for these same categories and 19 subcategories are also published from 1997, on both a raw and seasonally adjusted basis. The publication includes several pages of data analysis accompanied by graphics, definitions and data quality measures. Statistics are derived from surveys, administrative data and other sources.

    Release date: 2006-03-24
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Table: 63-224-X
    Description:

    The handbook is designed to be a comprehensive source of socio-economic statistics for all those who study the Canadian consumer market - market researchers, strategists, product planners and sales leaders. The broad range of data is equally relevant to consumer and to business-to-business marketing. The data present profiles of key industries, including the small business sector, as well as of consumers in all the provinces and the 45 major cities across Canada. International trade data, households, families and selected economic indicators, to name a few, provide useful information for businesses seeking to expand or develop new product lines. As well as including data from the 2001 Census and a wide range of other surveys, the 2006 edition also incorporates a number of features designed to make it more user-friendly. Features include a user's guide, annotated charts to reveal salient trends, data sources, and references to CANSIM.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

  • Table: 67-203-X
    Description:

    This comprehensive source on international service transactions contains aggregate and detailed breakouts by type of service each year since 1989. Major categories are travel, transportation, commercial and government services. Commercial services, comprising a range of business and professional services are categorized by geographical area (United States, European Union and all other countries), industry, country of control (Canada, United States, other) and whether or not the service was with foreign affiliated companies; these details are presented from 1996.

    New with the 1999 issue are annual breakdowns from 1991 of total services for 8 additional countries beyond the 47 already published. Each country is broken down into the following categories: travel, transportation, commercial and government services. For Canada as a whole, quarterly data for these same categories and 19 subcategories are also published from 1997, on both a raw and seasonally adjusted basis. The publication includes several pages of data analysis accompanied by graphics, definitions and data quality measures. Statistics are derived from surveys, administrative data and other sources.

    Release date: 2006-03-24

  • Table: 71-539-X
    Description:

    This publication about worker turnover in the Canadian economy provides comprehensive data for the first time on job separations and hiring, with emphasis on permanent separations, temporary separations, quits and layoffs.

    Release date: 1998-06-25
Analysis (62)

Analysis (62) (0 to 10 of 62 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100054
    Description:

    This article provides insights into how COVID-19 could potentially impact commercial and industrial machinery and equipment rental and leasing industry. This article also provides estimates for 2020 index values using past economic impacts as benchmarks.

    Release date: 2020-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007001
    Description:

    This study examines the factors that explain export orientation among Canadian Knowledge-Intensive Business Services (KIBS) firms, particularly innovativeness, while controlling for foreign control, size of establishment, training level of workforce, use of intellectual property protection and industry type. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2007-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060019000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Revenue multipliers show most industries outsourced more of their inputs to other industries in recent years, especially business services. But this outsourcing does not capture each industry's impact on GDP. These output multipliers are quite different from revenue multipliers.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038761
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For many organizations involved in economic development, business incubation is a key to creating and nurturing new business. There is currently very little information available on the business incubator sector in Canada. A new Statistics Canada pilot survey will collect and benchmark vital information on this largely unknown sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The "Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas" series of reports provides key background information on Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) for the period 1981 to 2001. Based primarily on census data, this series provides substantial information and analysis on several topics: low income, health, immigration, culture, housing, labour markets, industrial structure, mobility, public transit and commuting, and Aboriginal people. This final assessment summarizes the major findings of the eight reports and evaluates what has been learned. It points out that the series has three key contributions. First, it details how place matters. Census metropolitan areas differ greatly in many indicators, and their economic and social differences are important factors that define them. Accordingly, policy prescriptions affecting cities may need to reflect this diversity. Second, the series contributes substantially to the amount of data and analysis needed to make accurate policy assessments of what may be ailing in Canada's largest cities and where each problem is most acute. Third, it provides benchmarks against which future data 'most notably data from the 2006 Census' can be examined. This summary also briefly discusses some subjects which were not covered in the series, identifying these as data gaps, or areas where more research is needed.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    This classification system is used for organizing economic data by industry, and is used by Canada, Mexico and the United States. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 version 3.0 supersedes NAICS 2017 Version 2.0. NAICS is revised on a five-year cycle in order to ensure that the classification continues to reflect the changing structure of the economy. NAICS Canada 2017 version 3.0 groups economic activity into 20 sectors and 928 Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2018-09-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-601-X
    Description:

    This publication outlines the conceptual and statistical framework of the services sector in the accounts. The methodology and data sources used to calculate estimates of services in the current-price input-output accounts are described. Specific sources and methods are outlined for determining inputs, outputs and gross domestic product of service industries in the business sector.

    Release date: 2001-07-10
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